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authorLinus Torvalds <torvalds@ppc970.osdl.org>2005-04-16 15:20:36 -0700
committerLinus Torvalds <torvalds@ppc970.osdl.org>2005-04-16 15:20:36 -0700
commit1da177e4c3f41524e886b7f1b8a0c1fc7321cac2 (patch)
tree0bba044c4ce775e45a88a51686b5d9f90697ea9d /Documentation/input
downloadlinux-stericsson-1da177e4c3f41524e886b7f1b8a0c1fc7321cac2.tar.gz
Linux-2.6.12-rc2v2.6.12-rc2
Initial git repository build. I'm not bothering with the full history, even though we have it. We can create a separate "historical" git archive of that later if we want to, and in the meantime it's about 3.2GB when imported into git - space that would just make the early git days unnecessarily complicated, when we don't have a lot of good infrastructure for it. Let it rip!
Diffstat (limited to 'Documentation/input')
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/amijoy.txt184
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/atarikbd.txt709
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/cd32.txt19
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/cs461x.txt45
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/ff.txt227
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/gameport-programming.txt189
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/iforce-protocol.txt254
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/input-programming.txt281
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/input.txt312
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/interactive.fig42
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/joystick-api.txt316
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/joystick-parport.txt542
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/joystick.txt588
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/shape.fig65
-rw-r--r--Documentation/input/xpad.txt116
15 files changed, 3889 insertions, 0 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/input/amijoy.txt b/Documentation/input/amijoy.txt
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..3b8b2d43a68e
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/amijoy.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,184 @@
+Amiga 4-joystick parport extension
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+Parallel port pins:
+
+ (2) - Up1 (6) - Up2
+ (3) - Down1 (7) - Down2
+ (4) - Left1 (8) - Left2
+ (5) - Right1 (9) - Right2
+(13) - Fire1 (11) - Fire2
+(18) - Gnd1 (18) - Gnd2
+
+Amiga digital joystick pinout
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+(1) - Up
+(2) - Down
+(3) - Left
+(4) - Right
+(5) - n/c
+(6) - Fire button
+(7) - +5V (50mA)
+(8) - Gnd
+(9) - Thumb button
+
+Amiga mouse pinout
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+(1) - V-pulse
+(2) - H-pulse
+(3) - VQ-pulse
+(4) - HQ-pulse
+(5) - Middle button
+(6) - Left button
+(7) - +5V (50mA)
+(8) - Gnd
+(9) - Right button
+
+Amiga analog joystick pinout
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+(1) - Top button
+(2) - Top2 button
+(3) - Trigger button
+(4) - Thumb button
+(5) - Analog X
+(6) - n/c
+(7) - +5V (50mA)
+(8) - Gnd
+(9) - Analog Y
+
+Amiga lightpen pinout
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+(1) - n/c
+(2) - n/c
+(3) - n/c
+(4) - n/c
+(5) - Touch button
+(6) - /Beamtrigger
+(7) - +5V (50mA)
+(8) - Gnd
+(9) - Stylus button
+
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+NAME rev ADDR type chip Description
+JOY0DAT 00A R Denise Joystick-mouse 0 data (left vert, horiz)
+JOY1DAT 00C R Denise Joystick-mouse 1 data (right vert,horiz)
+
+ These addresses each read a 16 bit register. These in turn
+ are loaded from the MDAT serial stream and are clocked in on
+ the rising edge of SCLK. MLD output is used to parallel load
+ the external parallel-to-serial converter.This in turn is
+ loaded with the 4 quadrature inputs from each of two game
+ controller ports (8 total) plus 8 miscellaneous control bits
+ which are new for LISA and can be read in upper 8 bits of
+ LISAID.
+ Register bits are as follows:
+ Mouse counter usage (pins 1,3 =Yclock, pins 2,4 =Xclock)
+
+ BIT# 15 14 13 12 11 10 09 08 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
+JOY0DAT Y7 Y6 Y5 Y4 Y3 Y2 Y1 Y0 X7 X6 X5 X4 X3 X2 X1 X0
+JOY1DAT Y7 Y6 Y5 Y4 Y3 Y2 Y1 Y0 X7 X6 X5 X4 X3 X2 X1 X0
+
+ 0=LEFT CONTROLLER PAIR, 1=RIGHT CONTROLLER PAIR.
+ (4 counters total).The bit usage for both left and right
+ addresses is shown below. Each 6 bit counter (Y7-Y2,X7-X2) is
+ clocked by 2 of the signals input from the mouse serial
+ stream. Starting with first bit recived:
+
+ +-------------------+-----------------------------------------+
+ | Serial | Bit Name | Description |
+ +--------+----------+-----------------------------------------+
+ | 0 | M0H | JOY0DAT Horizontal Clock |
+ | 1 | M0HQ | JOY0DAT Horizontal Clock (quadrature) |
+ | 2 | M0V | JOY0DAT Vertical Clock |
+ | 3 | M0VQ | JOY0DAT Vertical Clock (quadrature) |
+ | 4 | M1V | JOY1DAT Horizontall Clock |
+ | 5 | M1VQ | JOY1DAT Horizontall Clock (quadrature) |
+ | 6 | M1V | JOY1DAT Vertical Clock |
+ | 7 | M1VQ | JOY1DAT Vertical Clock (quadrature) |
+ +--------+----------+-----------------------------------------+
+
+ Bits 1 and 0 of each counter (Y1-Y0,X1-X0) may be
+ read to determine the state of the related input signal pair.
+ This allows these pins to double as joystick switch inputs.
+ Joystick switch closures can be deciphered as follows:
+
+ +------------+------+---------------------------------+
+ | Directions | Pin# | Counter bits |
+ +------------+------+---------------------------------+
+ | Forward | 1 | Y1 xor Y0 (BIT#09 xor BIT#08) |
+ | Left | 3 | Y1 |
+ | Back | 2 | X1 xor X0 (BIT#01 xor BIT#00) |
+ | Right | 4 | X1 |
+ +------------+------+---------------------------------+
+
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+NAME rev ADDR type chip Description
+JOYTEST 036 W Denise Write to all 4 joystick-mouse counters at once.
+
+ Mouse counter write test data:
+ BIT# 15 14 13 12 11 10 09 08 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
+ JOYxDAT Y7 Y6 Y5 Y4 Y3 Y2 xx xx X7 X6 X5 X4 X3 X2 xx xx
+ JOYxDAT Y7 Y6 Y5 Y4 Y3 Y2 xx xx X7 X6 X5 X4 X3 X2 xx xx
+
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+NAME rev ADDR type chip Description
+POT0DAT h 012 R Paula Pot counter data left pair (vert, horiz)
+POT1DAT h 014 R Paula Pot counter data right pair (vert,horiz)
+
+ These addresses each read a pair of 8 bit pot counters.
+ (4 counters total). The bit assignment for both
+ addresses is shown below. The counters are stopped by signals
+ from 2 controller connectors (left-right) with 2 pins each.
+
+ BIT# 15 14 13 12 11 10 09 08 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
+ RIGHT Y7 Y6 Y5 Y4 Y3 Y2 Y1 Y0 X7 X6 X5 X4 X3 X2 X1 X0
+ LEFT Y7 Y6 Y5 Y4 Y3 Y2 Y1 Y0 X7 X6 X5 X4 X3 X2 X1 X0
+
+ +--------------------------+-------+
+ | CONNECTORS | PAULA |
+ +-------+------+-----+-----+-------+
+ | Loc. | Dir. | Sym | pin | pin |
+ +-------+------+-----+-----+-------+
+ | RIGHT | Y | RX | 9 | 33 |
+ | RIGHT | X | RX | 5 | 32 |
+ | LEFT | Y | LY | 9 | 36 |
+ | LEFT | X | LX | 5 | 35 |
+ +-------+------+-----+-----+-------+
+
+ With normal (NTSC or PAL) horiz. line rate, the pots will
+ give a full scale (FF) reading with about 500kohms in one
+ frame time. With proportionally faster horiz line times,
+ the counters will count proportionally faster.
+ This should be noted when doing variable beam displays.
+
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+NAME rev ADDR type chip Description
+POTGO 034 W Paula Pot port (4 bit) bi-direction and data, and pot counter start.
+
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+NAME rev ADDR type chip Description
+POTINP 016 R Paula Pot pin data read
+
+ This register controls a 4 bit bi-direction I/O port
+ that shares the same 4 pins as the 4 pot counters above.
+
+ +-------+----------+---------------------------------------------+
+ | BIT# | FUNCTION | DESCRIPTION |
+ +-------+----------+---------------------------------------------+
+ | 15 | OUTRY | Output enable for Paula pin 33 |
+ | 14 | DATRY | I/O data Paula pin 33 |
+ | 13 | OUTRX | Output enable for Paula pin 32 |
+ | 12 | DATRX | I/O data Paula pin 32 |
+ | 11 | OUTLY | Out put enable for Paula pin 36 |
+ | 10 | DATLY | I/O data Paula pin 36 |
+ | 09 | OUTLX | Output enable for Paula pin 35 |
+ | 08 | DATLX | I/O data Paula pin 35 |
+ | 07-01 | X | Not used |
+ | 00 | START | Start pots (dump capacitors,start counters) |
+ +-------+----------+---------------------------------------------+
+
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
diff --git a/Documentation/input/atarikbd.txt b/Documentation/input/atarikbd.txt
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..8fb896c74114
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/atarikbd.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,709 @@
+Intelligent Keyboard (ikbd) Protocol
+
+
+1. Introduction
+
+The Atari Corp. Intelligent Keyboard (ikbd) is a general purpose keyboard
+controller that is flexible enough that it can be used in a variety of
+products without modification. The keyboard, with its microcontroller,
+provides a convenient connection point for a mouse and switch-type joysticks.
+The ikbd processor also maintains a time-of-day clock with one second
+resolution.
+The ikbd has been designed to be general enough that it can be used with a
+ariety of new computer products. Product variations in a number of
+keyswitches, mouse resolution, etc. can be accommodated.
+The ikbd communicates with the main processor over a high speed bi-directional
+serial interface. It can function in a variety of modes to facilitate
+different applications of the keyboard, joysticks, or mouse. Limited use of
+the controller is possible in applications in which only a unidirectional
+communications medium is available by carefully designing the default modes.
+
+3. Keyboard
+
+The keyboard always returns key make/break scan codes. The ikbd generates
+keyboard scan codes for each key press and release. The key scan make (key
+closure) codes start at 1, and are defined in Appendix A. For example, the
+ISO key position in the scan code table should exist even if no keyswitch
+exists in that position on a particular keyboard. The break code for each key
+is obtained by ORing 0x80 with the make code.
+
+The special codes 0xF6 through 0xFF are reserved for use as follows:
+ 0xF6 status report
+ 0xF7 absolute mouse position record
+ 0xF8-0xFB relative mouse position records(lsbs determind by
+ mouse button states)
+ 0xFC time-of-day
+ 0xFD joystick report (both sticks)
+ 0xFE joystick 0 event
+ 0xFF joystick 1 event
+
+The two shift keys return different scan codes in this mode. The ENTER key
+and the RETurn key are also distinct.
+
+4. Mouse
+
+The mouse port should be capable of supporting a mouse with resolution of
+approximately 200 counts (phase changes or 'clicks') per inch of travel. The
+mouse should be scanned at a rate that will permit accurate tracking at
+velocities up to 10 inches per second.
+The ikbd can report mouse motion in three distinctly different ways. It can
+report relative motion, absolute motion in a coordinate system maintained
+within the ikbd, or by converting mouse motion into keyboard cursor control
+key equivalents.
+The mouse buttons can be treated as part of the mouse or as additional
+keyboard keys.
+
+4.1 Relative Position Reporting
+
+In relative position mode, the ikbd will return relative mouse position
+records whenever a mouse event occurs. A mouse event consists of a mouse
+button being pressed or released, or motion in either axis exceeding a
+settable threshold of motion. Regardless of the threshold, all bits of
+resolution are returned to the host computer.
+Note that the ikbd may return mouse relative position reports with
+significantly more than the threshold delta x or y. This may happen since no
+relative mouse motion events will be generated: (a) while the keyboard has
+been 'paused' ( the event will be stored until keyboard communications is
+resumed) (b) while any event is being transmitted.
+
+The relative mouse position record is a three byte record of the form
+(regardless of keyboard mode):
+ %111110xy ; mouse position record flag
+ ; where y is the right button state
+ ; and x is the left button state
+ X ; delta x as twos complement integer
+ Y ; delta y as twos complement integer
+
+Note that the value of the button state bits should be valid even if the
+MOUSE BUTTON ACTION has set the buttons to act like part of the keyboard.
+If the accumulated motion before the report packet is generated exceeds the
++127...-128 range, the motion is broken into multiple packets.
+Note that the sign of the delta y reported is a function of the Y origin
+selected.
+
+4.2 Absolute Position reporting
+
+The ikbd can also maintain absolute mouse position. Commands exist for
+reseting the mouse position, setting X/Y scaling, and interrogating the
+current mouse position.
+
+4.3 Mouse Cursor Key Mode
+
+The ikbd can translate mouse motion into the equivalent cursor keystrokes.
+The number of mouse clicks per keystroke is independently programmable in
+each axis. The ikbd internally maintains mouse motion information to the
+highest resolution available, and merely generates a pair of cursor key events
+for each multiple of the scale factor.
+Mouse motion produces the cursor key make code immediately followed by the
+break code for the appropriate cursor key. The mouse buttons produce scan
+codes above those normally assigned for the largest envisioned keyboard (i.e.
+LEFT=0x74 & RIGHT=0x75).
+
+5. Joystick
+
+5.1 Joystick Event Reporting
+
+In this mode, the ikbd generates a record whever the joystick position is
+changed (i.e. for each opening or closing of a joystick switch or trigger).
+
+The joystick event record is two bytes of the form:
+ %1111111x ; Joystick event marker
+ ; where x is Joystick 0 or 1
+ %x000yyyy ; where yyyy is the stick position
+ ; and x is the trigger
+
+5.2 Joystick Interrogation
+
+The current state of the joystick ports may be interrogated at any time in
+this mode by sending an 'Interrogate Joystick' command to the ikbd.
+
+The ikbd response to joystick interrogation is a three byte report of the form
+ 0xFD ; joystick report header
+ %x000yyyy ; Joystick 0
+ %x000yyyy ; Joystick 1
+ ; where x is the trigger
+ ; and yyy is the stick position
+
+5.3 Joystick Monitoring
+
+A mode is available that devotes nearly all of the keyboard communications
+time to reporting the state of the joystick ports at a user specifiable rate.
+It remains in this mode until reset or commanded into another mode. The PAUSE
+command in this mode not only stop the output but also temporarily stops
+scanning the joysticks (samples are not queued).
+
+5.4 Fire Button Monitoring
+
+A mode is provided to permit monitoring a single input bit at a high rate. In
+this mode the ikbd monitors the state of the Joystick 1 fire button at the
+maximum rate permitted by the serial communication channel. The data is packed
+8 bits per byte for transmission to the host. The ikbd remains in this mode
+until reset or commanded into another mode. The PAUSE command in this mode not
+only stops the output but also temporarily stops scanning the button (samples
+are not queued).
+
+5.5 Joystick Key Code Mode
+
+The ikbd may be commanded to translate the use of either joystick into the
+equivalent cursor control keystroke(s). The ikbd provides a single breakpoint
+velocity joystick cursor.
+Joystick events produce the make code, immediately followed by the break code
+for the appropriate cursor motion keys. The trigger or fire buttons of the
+joysticks produce pseudo key scan codes above those used by the largest key
+matrix envisioned (i.e. JOYSTICK0=0x74, JOYSTICK1=0x75).
+
+6. Time-of-Day Clock
+
+The ikbd also maintains a time-of-day clock for the system. Commands are
+available to set and interrogate the timer-of-day clock. Time-keeping is
+maintained down to a resolution of one second.
+
+7. Status Inquiries
+
+The current state of ikbd modes and parameters may be found by sending status
+inquiry commands that correspond to the ikbd set commands.
+
+8. Power-Up Mode
+
+The keyboard controller will perform a simple self-test on power-up to detect
+major controller faults (ROM checksum and RAM test) and such things as stuck
+keys. Any keys down at power-up are presumed to be stuck, and their BREAK
+(sic) code is returned (which without the preceding MAKE code is a flag for a
+keyboard error). If the controller self-test completes without error, the code
+0xF0 is returned. (This code will be used to indicate the version/rlease of
+the ikbd controller. The first release of the ikbd is version 0xF0, should
+there be a second release it will be 0xF1, and so on.)
+The ikbd defaults to a mouse position reporting with threshold of 1 unit in
+either axis and the Y=0 origin at the top of the screen, and joystick event
+reporting mode for joystick 1, with both buttons being logically assigned to
+the mouse. After any joystick command, the ikbd assumes that joysticks are
+connected to both Joystick0 and Joystick1. Any mouse command (except MOUSE
+DISABLE) then causes port 0 to again be scanned as if it were a mouse, and
+both buttons are logically connected to it. If a mouse diable command is
+received while port 0 is presumed to be a mouse, the button is logically
+assigned to Joystick1 ( until the mouse is reenabled by another mouse command).
+
+9. ikbd Command Set
+
+This section contains a list of commands that can be sent to the ikbd. Command
+codes (such as 0x00) which are not specified should perform no operation
+(NOPs).
+
+9.1 RESET
+
+ 0x80
+ 0x01
+
+N.B. The RESET command is the only two byte command understood by the ikbd.
+Any byte following an 0x80 command byte other than 0x01 is ignored (and causes
+the 0x80 to be ignored).
+A reset may also be caused by sending a break lasting at least 200mS to the
+ikbd.
+Executing the RESET command returns the keyboard to its default (power-up)
+mode and parameter settings. It does not affect the time-of-day clock.
+The RESET command or function causes the ikbd to perform a simple self-test.
+If the test is successful, the ikbd will send the code of 0xF0 within 300mS
+of receipt of the RESET command (or the end of the break, or power-up). The
+ikbd will then scan the key matrix for any stuck (closed) keys. Any keys found
+closed will cause the break scan code to be generated (the break code arriving
+without being preceded by the make code is a flag for a key matrix error).
+
+9.2. SET MOUSE BUTTON ACTION
+
+ 0x07
+ %00000mss ; mouse button action
+ ; (m is presumed = 1 when in MOUSE KEYCODE mode)
+ ; mss=0xy, mouse button press or release causes mouse
+ ; position report
+ ; where y=1, mouse key press causes absolute report
+ ; and x=1, mouse key release causes absolute report
+ ; mss=100, mouse buttons act like keys
+
+This command sets how the ikbd should treat the buttons on the mouse. The
+default mouse button action mode is %00000000, the buttons are treated as part
+of the mouse logically.
+When buttons act like keys, LEFT=0x74 & RIGHT=0x75.
+
+9.3 SET RELATIVE MOUSE POSITION REPORTING
+
+ 0x08
+
+Set relative mouse position reporting. (DEFAULT) Mouse position packets are
+generated asynchronously by the ikbd whenever motion exceeds the setable
+threshold in either axis (see SET MOUSE THRESHOLD). Depending upon the mouse
+key mode, mouse position reports may also be generated when either mouse
+button is pressed or released. Otherwise the mouse buttons behave as if they
+were keyboard keys.
+
+9.4 SET ABSOLUTE MOUSE POSITIONING
+
+ 0x09
+ XMSB ; X maximum (in scaled mouse clicks)
+ XLSB
+ YMSB ; Y maximum (in scaled mouse clicks)
+ YLSB
+
+Set absolute mouse position maintenance. Resets the ikbd maintained X and Y
+coordinates.
+In this mode, the value of the internally maintained coordinates does NOT wrap
+between 0 and large positive numbers. Excess motion below 0 is ignored. The
+command sets the maximum positive value that can be attained in the scaled
+coordinate system. Motion beyond that value is also ignored.
+
+9.5 SET MOUSE KEYCODE MOSE
+
+ 0x0A
+ deltax ; distance in X clicks to return (LEFT) or (RIGHT)
+ deltay ; distance in Y clicks to return (UP) or (DOWN)
+
+Set mouse monitoring routines to return cursor motion keycodes instead of
+either RELATIVE or ABSOLUTE motion records. The ikbd returns the appropriate
+cursor keycode after mouse travel exceeding the user specified deltas in
+either axis. When the keyboard is in key scan code mode, mouse motion will
+cause the make code immediately followed by the break code. Note that this
+command is not affected by the mouse motion origin.
+
+9..6 SET MOUSE THRESHOLD
+
+ 0x0B
+ X ; x threshold in mouse ticks (positive integers)
+ Y ; y threshold in mouse ticks (positive integers)
+
+This command sets the threshold before a mouse event is generated. Note that
+it does NOT affect the resolution of the data returned to the host. This
+command is valid only in RELATIVE MOUSE POSITIONING mode. The thresholds
+default to 1 at RESET (or power-up).
+
+9.7 SET MOUSE SCALE
+
+ 0x0C
+ X ; horizontal mouse ticks per internel X
+ Y ; vertical mouse ticks per internel Y
+
+This command sets the scale factor for the ABSOLUTE MOUSE POSITIONING mode.
+In this mode, the specified number of mouse phase changes ('clicks') must
+occur before the internally maintained coordinate is changed by one
+(independently scaled for each axis). Remember that the mouse position
+information is available only by interrogating the ikbd in the ABSOLUTE MOUSE
+POSITIONING mode unless the ikbd has been commanded to report on button press
+or release (see SET MOSE BUTTON ACTION).
+
+9.8 INTERROGATE MOUSE POSITION
+
+ 0x0D
+ Returns:
+ 0xF7 ; absolute mouse position header
+ BUTTONS
+ 0000dcba ; where a is right button down since last interrogation
+ ; b is right button up since last
+ ; c is left button down since last
+ ; d is left button up since last
+ XMSB ; X coordinate
+ XLSB
+ YMSB ; Y coordinate
+ YLSB
+
+The INTERROGATE MOUSE POSITION command is valid when in the ABSOLUTE MOUSE
+POSITIONING mode, regardless of the setting of the MOUSE BUTTON ACTION.
+
+9.9 LOAD MOUSE POSITION
+
+ 0x0E
+ 0x00 ; filler
+ XMSB ; X coordinate
+ XLSB ; (in scaled coordinate system)
+ YMSB ; Y coordinate
+ YLSB
+
+This command allows the user to preset the internally maintained absolute
+mouse position.
+
+9.10 SET Y=0 AT BOTTOM
+
+ 0x0F
+
+This command makes the origin of the Y axis to be at the bottom of the
+logical coordinate system internel to the ikbd for all relative or absolute
+mouse motion. This causes mouse motion toward the user to be negative in sign
+and away from the user to be positive.
+
+9.11 SET Y=0 AT TOP
+
+ 0x10
+
+Makes the origin of the Y axis to be at the top of the logical coordinate
+system within the ikbd for all relative or absolute mouse motion. (DEFAULT)
+This causes mouse motion toward the user to be positive in sign and away from
+the user to be negative.
+
+9.12 RESUME
+
+ 0x11
+
+Resume sending data to the host. Since any command received by the ikbd after
+its output has been paused also causes an implicit RESUME this command can be
+thought of as a NO OPERATION command. If this command is received by the ikbd
+and it is not PAUSED, it is simply ignored.
+
+9.13 DISABLE MOUSE
+
+ 0x12
+
+All mouse event reporting is disabled (and scanning may be internally
+disabled). Any valid mouse mode command resumes mouse motion monitoring. (The
+valid mouse mode commands are SET RELATIVE MOUSE POSITION REPORTING, SET
+ABSOLUTE MOUSE POSITIONING, and SET MOUSE KEYCODE MODE. )
+N.B. If the mouse buttons have been commanded to act like keyboard keys, this
+command DOES affect their actions.
+
+9.14 PAUSE OUTPUT
+
+ 0x13
+
+Stop sending data to the host until another valid command is received. Key
+matrix activity is still monitored and scan codes or ASCII characters enqueued
+(up to the maximum supported by the microcontroller) to be sent when the host
+allows the output to be resumed. If in the JOYSTICK EVENT REPORTING mode,
+joystick events are also queued.
+Mouse motion should be accumulated while the output is paused. If the ikbd is
+in RELATIVE MOUSE POSITIONING REPORTING mode, motion is accumulated beyond the
+normal threshold limits to produce the minimum number of packets necessary for
+transmission when output is resumed. Pressing or releasing either mouse button
+causes any accumulated motion to be immediately queued as packets, if the
+mouse is in RELATIVE MOUSE POSITION REPORTING mode.
+Because of the limitations of the microcontroller memory this command should
+be used sparingly, and the output should not be shut of for more than <tbd>
+milliseconds at a time.
+The output is stopped only at the end of the current 'even'. If the PAUSE
+OUTPUT command is received in the middle of a multiple byte report, the packet
+will still be transmitted to conclusion and then the PAUSE will take effect.
+When the ikbd is in either the JOYSTICK MONITORING mode or the FIRE BUTTON
+MONITORING mode, the PAUSE OUTPUT command also temporarily stops the
+monitoring process (i.e. the samples are not enqueued for transmission).
+
+0.15 SET JOYSTICK EVENT REPORTING
+
+ 0x14
+
+Enter JOYSTICK EVENT REPORTING mode (DEFAULT). Each opening or closure of a
+joystick switch or trigger causes a joystick event record to be generated.
+
+9.16 SET JOYSTICK INTERROGATION MODE
+
+ 0x15
+
+Disables JOYSTICK EVENT REPORTING. Host must send individual JOYSTICK
+INTERROGATE commands to sense joystick state.
+
+9.17 JOYSTICK INTERROGATE
+
+ 0x16
+
+Return a record indicating the current state of the joysticks. This command
+is valid in either the JOYSTICK EVENT REPORTING mode or the JOYSTICK
+INTERROGATION MODE.
+
+9.18 SET JOYSTICK MONITORING
+
+ 0x17
+ rate ; time between samples in hundreths of a second
+ Returns: (in packets of two as long as in mode)
+ %000000xy ; where y is JOYSTICK1 Fire button
+ ; and x is JOYSTICK0 Fire button
+ %nnnnmmmm ; where m is JOYSTICK1 state
+ ; and n is JOYSTICK0 state
+
+Sets the ikbd to do nothing but monitor the serial command lne, maintain the
+time-of-day clock, and monitor the joystick. The rate sets the interval
+between joystick samples.
+N.B. The user should not set the rate higher than the serial communications
+channel will allow the 2 bytes packets to be transmitted.
+
+9.19 SET FIRE BUTTON MONITORING
+
+ 0x18
+ Returns: (as long as in mode)
+ %bbbbbbbb ; state of the JOYSTICK1 fire button packed
+ ; 8 bits per byte, the first sample if the MSB
+
+Set the ikbd to do nothing but monitor the serial command line, maintain the
+time-of-day clock, and monitor the fire button on Joystick 1. The fire button
+is scanned at a rate that causes 8 samples to be made in the time it takes for
+the previous byte to be sent to the host (i.e. scan rate = 8/10 * baud rate).
+The sample interval should be as constant as possible.
+
+9.20 SET JOYSTICK KEYCODE MODE
+
+ 0x19
+ RX ; length of time (in tenths of seconds) until
+ ; horizontal velocity breakpoint is reached
+ RY ; length of time (in tenths of seconds) until
+ ; vertical velocity breakpoint is reached
+ TX ; length (in tenths of seconds) of joystick closure
+ ; until horizontal cursor key is generated before RX
+ ; has elapsed
+ TY ; length (in tenths of seconds) of joystick closure
+ ; until vertical cursor key is generated before RY
+ ; has elapsed
+ VX ; length (in tenths of seconds) of joystick closure
+ ; until horizontal cursor keystokes are generated
+ ; after RX has elapsed
+ VY ; length (in tenths of seconds) of joystick closure
+ ; until vertical cursor keystokes are generated
+ ; after RY has elapsed
+
+In this mode, joystick 0 is scanned in a way that simulates cursor keystrokes.
+On initial closure, a keystroke pair (make/break) is generated. Then up to Rn
+tenths of seconds later, keystroke pairs are generated every Tn tenths of
+seconds. After the Rn breakpoint is reached, keystroke pairs are generated
+every Vn tenths of seconds. This provides a velocity (auto-repeat) breakpoint
+feature.
+Note that by setting RX and/or Ry to zero, the velocity feature can be
+disabled. The values of TX and TY then become meaningless, and the generation
+of cursor 'keystrokes' is set by VX and VY.
+
+9.21 DISABLE JOYSTICKS
+
+ 0x1A
+
+Disable the generation of any joystick events (and scanning may be internally
+disabled). Any valid joystick mode command resumes joystick monitoring. (The
+joystick mode commands are SET JOYSTICK EVENT REPORTING, SET JOYSTICK
+INTERROGATION MODE, SET JOYSTICK MONITORING, SET FIRE BUTTON MONITORING, and
+SET JOYSTICK KEYCODE MODE.)
+
+9.22 TIME-OF-DAY CLOCK SET
+
+ 0x1B
+ YY ; year (2 least significant digits)
+ MM ; month
+ DD ; day
+ hh ; hour
+ mm ; minute
+ ss ; second
+
+All time-of-day data should be sent to the ikbd in packed BCD format.
+Any digit that is not a valid BCD digit should be treated as a 'don't care'
+and not alter that particular field of the date or time. This permits setting
+only some subfields of the time-of-day clock.
+
+9.23 INTERROGATE TIME-OF-DAT CLOCK
+
+ 0x1C
+ Returns:
+ 0xFC ; time-of-day event header
+ YY ; year (2 least significant digits)
+ MM ; month
+ DD ; day
+ hh ; hour
+ mm ; minute
+ ss ; second
+
+ All time-of-day is sent in packed BCD format.
+
+9.24 MEMORY LOAD
+
+ 0x20
+ ADRMSB ; address in controller
+ ADRLSB ; memory to be loaded
+ NUM ; number of bytes (0-128)
+ { data }
+
+This command permits the host to load arbitrary values into the ikbd
+controller memory. The time between data bytes must be less than 20ms.
+
+9.25 MEMORY READ
+
+ 0x21
+ ADRMSB ; address in controller
+ ADRLSB ; memory to be read
+ Returns:
+ 0xF6 ; status header
+ 0x20 ; memory access
+ { data } ; 6 data bytes starting at ADR
+
+This comand permits the host to read from the ikbd controller memory.
+
+9.26 CONTROLLER EXECUTE
+
+ 0x22
+ ADRMSB ; address of subroutine in
+ ADRLSB ; controller memory to be called
+
+This command allows the host to command the execution of a subroutine in the
+ikbd controller memory.
+
+9.27 STATUS INQUIRIES
+
+ Status commands are formed by inclusively ORing 0x80 with the
+ relevant SET command.
+
+ Example:
+ 0x88 (or 0x89 or 0x8A) ; request mouse mode
+ Returns:
+ 0xF6 ; status response header
+ mode ; 0x08 is RELATIVE
+ ; 0x09 is ABSOLUTE
+ ; 0x0A is KEYCODE
+ param1 ; 0 is RELATIVE
+ ; XMSB maximum if ABSOLUTE
+ ; DELTA X is KEYCODE
+ param2 ; 0 is RELATIVE
+ ; YMSB maximum if ABSOLUTE
+ ; DELTA Y is KEYCODE
+ param3 ; 0 if RELATIVE
+ ; or KEYCODE
+ ; YMSB is ABSOLUTE
+ param4 ; 0 if RELATIVE
+ ; or KEYCODE
+ ; YLSB is ABSOLUTE
+ 0 ; pad
+ 0
+
+The STATUS INQUIRY commands request the ikbd to return either the current mode
+or the parameters associated with a given command. All status reports are
+padded to form 8 byte long return packets. The responses to the status
+requests are designed so that the host may store them away (after stripping
+off the status report header byte) and later send them back as commands to
+ikbd to restore its state. The 0 pad bytes will be treated as NOPs by the
+ikbd.
+
+ Valid STATUS INQUIRY commands are:
+
+ 0x87 mouse button action
+ 0x88 mouse mode
+ 0x89
+ 0x8A
+ 0x8B mnouse threshold
+ 0x8C mouse scale
+ 0x8F mouse vertical coordinates
+ 0x90 ( returns 0x0F Y=0 at bottom
+ 0x10 Y=0 at top )
+ 0x92 mouse enable/disable
+ ( returns 0x00 enabled)
+ 0x12 disabled )
+ 0x94 joystick mode
+ 0x95
+ 0x96
+ 0x9A joystick enable/disable
+ ( returns 0x00 enabled
+ 0x1A disabled )
+
+It is the (host) programmer's responsibility to have only one unanswered
+inquiry in process at a time.
+STATUS INQUIRY commands are not valid if the ikbd is in JOYSTICK MONITORING
+mode or FIRE BUTTON MONITORING mode.
+
+
+10. SCAN CODES
+
+The key scan codes return by the ikbd are chosen to simplify the
+implementaion of GSX.
+
+GSX Standard Keyboard Mapping.
+
+Hex Keytop
+01 Esc
+02 1
+03 2
+04 3
+05 4
+06 5
+07 6
+08 7
+09 8
+0A 9
+0B 0
+0C -
+0D ==
+0E BS
+0F TAB
+10 Q
+11 W
+12 E
+13 R
+14 T
+15 Y
+16 U
+17 I
+18 O
+19 P
+1A [
+1B ]
+1C RET
+1D CTRL
+1E A
+1F S
+20 D
+21 F
+22 G
+23 H
+24 J
+25 K
+26 L
+27 ;
+28 '
+29 `
+2A (LEFT) SHIFT
+2B \
+2C Z
+2D X
+2E C
+2F V
+30 B
+31 N
+32 M
+33 ,
+34 .
+35 /
+36 (RIGHT) SHIFT
+37 { NOT USED }
+38 ALT
+39 SPACE BAR
+3A CAPS LOCK
+3B F1
+3C F2
+3D F3
+3E F4
+3F F5
+40 F6
+41 F7
+42 F8
+43 F9
+44 F10
+45 { NOT USED }
+46 { NOT USED }
+47 HOME
+48 UP ARROW
+49 { NOT USED }
+4A KEYPAD -
+4B LEFT ARROW
+4C { NOT USED }
+4D RIGHT ARROW
+4E KEYPAD +
+4F { NOT USED }
+50 DOWN ARROW
+51 { NOT USED }
+52 INSERT
+53 DEL
+54 { NOT USED }
+5F { NOT USED }
+60 ISO KEY
+61 UNDO
+62 HELP
+63 KEYPAD (
+64 KEYPAD /
+65 KEYPAD *
+66 KEYPAD *
+67 KEYPAD 7
+68 KEYPAD 8
+69 KEYPAD 9
+6A KEYPAD 4
+6B KEYPAD 5
+6C KEYPAD 6
+6D KEYPAD 1
+6E KEYPAD 2
+6F KEYPAD 3
+70 KEYPAD 0
+71 KEYPAD .
+72 KEYPAD ENTER
diff --git a/Documentation/input/cd32.txt b/Documentation/input/cd32.txt
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..a003d9b41eca
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/cd32.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,19 @@
+I have written a small patch that let's me use my Amiga CD32
+joypad connected to the parallel port. Thought I'd share it with you so
+you can add it to the list of supported joysticks (hopefully someone will
+find it useful).
+
+It needs the following wiring:
+
+CD32 pad | Parallel port
+----------------------------
+1 (Up) | 2 (D0)
+2 (Down) | 3 (D1)
+3 (Left) | 4 (D2)
+4 (Right) | 5 (D3)
+5 (Fire3) | 14 (AUTOFD)
+6 (Fire1) | 17 (SELIN)
+7 (+5V) | 1 (STROBE)
+8 (Gnd) | 18 (Gnd)
+9 (Fire2) | 7 (D5)
+
diff --git a/Documentation/input/cs461x.txt b/Documentation/input/cs461x.txt
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..6181747a14d8
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/cs461x.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,45 @@
+Preface.
+
+This is a new low-level driver to support analog joystick attached to
+Crystal SoundFusion CS4610/CS4612/CS4615. This code is based upon
+Vortex/Solo drivers as an example of decoration style, and ALSA
+0.5.8a kernel drivers as an chipset documentation and samples.
+
+This version does not have cooked mode support; the basic code
+is present here, but have not tested completely. The button analysis
+is completed in this mode, but the axis movement is not.
+
+Raw mode works fine with analog joystick front-end driver and cs461x
+driver as a backend. I've tested this driver with CS4610, 4-axis and
+4-button joystick; I mean the jstest utility. Also I've tried to
+play in xracer game using joystick, and the result is better than
+keyboard only mode.
+
+The sensitivity and calibrate quality have not been tested; the two
+reasons are performed: the same hardware cannot work under Win95 (blue
+screen in VJOYD); I have no documentation on my chip; and the existing
+behavior in my case was not raised the requirement of joystick calibration.
+So the driver have no code to perform hardware related calibration.
+
+The patch contains minor changes of Config.in and Makefile files. All
+needed code have been moved to one separate file cs461x.c like ns558.c
+This driver have the basic support for PCI devices only; there is no
+ISA or PnP ISA cards supported. AFAIK the ns558 have support for Crystal
+ISA and PnP ISA series.
+
+The driver works witn ALSA drivers simultaneously. For exmple, the xracer
+uses joystick as input device and PCM device as sound output in one time.
+There are no sound or input collisions detected. The source code have
+comments about them; but I've found the joystick can be initialized
+separately of ALSA modules. So, you canm use only one joystick driver
+without ALSA drivers. The ALSA drivers are not needed to compile or
+run this driver.
+
+There are no debug information print have been placed in source, and no
+specific options required to work this driver. The found chipset parameters
+are printed via printk(KERN_INFO "..."), see the /var/log/messages to
+inspect cs461x: prefixed messages to determine possible card detection
+errors.
+
+Regards,
+Viktor
diff --git a/Documentation/input/ff.txt b/Documentation/input/ff.txt
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..efa7dd6751f3
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/ff.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,227 @@
+Force feedback for Linux.
+By Johann Deneux <deneux@ifrance.com> on 2001/04/22.
+You may redistribute this file. Please remember to include shape.fig and
+interactive.fig as well.
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+0. Introduction
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+This document describes how to use force feedback devices under Linux. The
+goal is not to support these devices as if they were simple input-only devices
+(as it is already the case), but to really enable the rendering of force
+effects.
+At the moment, only I-Force devices are supported, and not officially. That
+means I had to find out how the protocol works on my own. Of course, the
+information I managed to grasp is far from being complete, and I can not
+guarranty that this driver will work for you.
+This document only describes the force feedback part of the driver for I-Force
+devices. Please read joystick.txt before reading further this document.
+
+2. Instructions to the user
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+Here are instructions on how to compile and use the driver. In fact, this
+driver is the normal iforce, input and evdev drivers written by Vojtech
+Pavlik, plus additions to support force feedback.
+
+Before you start, let me WARN you that some devices shake violently during the
+initialisation phase. This happens for example with my "AVB Top Shot Pegasus".
+To stop this annoying behaviour, move you joystick to its limits. Anyway, you
+should keep a hand on your device, in order to avoid it to brake down if
+something goes wrong.
+
+At the kernel's compilation:
+ - Enable IForce/Serial
+ - Enable Event interface
+
+Compile the modules, install them.
+
+You also need inputattach.
+
+You then need to insert the modules into the following order:
+% modprobe joydev
+% modprobe serport # Only for serial
+% modprobe iforce
+% modprobe evdev
+% ./inputattach -ifor $2 & # Only for serial
+If you are using USB, you don't need the inputattach step.
+
+Please check that you have all the /dev/input entries needed:
+cd /dev
+rm js*
+mkdir input
+mknod input/js0 c 13 0
+mknod input/js1 c 13 1
+mknod input/js2 c 13 2
+mknod input/js3 c 13 3
+ln -s input/js0 js0
+ln -s input/js1 js1
+ln -s input/js2 js2
+ln -s input/js3 js3
+
+mknod input/event0 c 13 64
+mknod input/event1 c 13 65
+mknod input/event2 c 13 66
+mknod input/event3 c 13 67
+
+2.1 Does it work ?
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+There is an utility called fftest that will allow you to test the driver.
+% fftest /dev/input/eventXX
+
+3. Instructions to the developper
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ All interactions are done using the event API. That is, you can use ioctl()
+and write() on /dev/input/eventXX.
+ This information is subject to change.
+
+3.1 Querying device capabilities
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+#include <linux/input.h>
+#include <sys/ioctl.h>
+
+unsigned long features[1 + FF_MAX/sizeof(unsigned long)];
+int ioctl(int file_descriptor, int request, unsigned long *features);
+
+"request" must be EVIOCGBIT(EV_FF, size of features array in bytes )
+
+Returns the features supported by the device. features is a bitfield with the
+following bits:
+- FF_X has an X axis (usually joysticks)
+- FF_Y has an Y axis (usually joysticks)
+- FF_WHEEL has a wheel (usually sterring wheels)
+- FF_CONSTANT can render constant force effects
+- FF_PERIODIC can render periodic effects (sine, triangle, square...)
+- FF_RAMP can render ramp effects
+- FF_SPRING can simulate the presence of a spring
+- FF_FRICTION can simulate friction
+- FF_DAMPER can simulate damper effects
+- FF_RUMBLE rumble effects (normally the only effect supported by rumble
+ pads)
+- FF_INERTIA can simulate inertia
+
+
+int ioctl(int fd, EVIOCGEFFECTS, int *n);
+
+Returns the number of effects the device can keep in its memory.
+
+3.2 Uploading effects to the device
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+#include <linux/input.h>
+#include <sys/ioctl.h>
+
+int ioctl(int file_descriptor, int request, struct ff_effect *effect);
+
+"request" must be EVIOCSFF.
+
+"effect" points to a structure describing the effect to upload. The effect is
+uploaded, but not played.
+The content of effect may be modified. In particular, its field "id" is set
+to the unique id assigned by the driver. This data is required for performing
+some operations (removing an effect, controlling the playback).
+This if field must be set to -1 by the user in order to tell the driver to
+allocate a new effect.
+See <linux/input.h> for a description of the ff_effect stuct. You should also
+find help in a few sketches, contained in files shape.fig and interactive.fig.
+You need xfig to visualize these files.
+
+3.3 Removing an effect from the device
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+int ioctl(int fd, EVIOCRMFF, effect.id);
+
+This makes room for new effects in the device's memory. Please note this won't
+stop the effect if it was playing.
+
+3.4 Controlling the playback of effects
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+Control of playing is done with write(). Below is an example:
+
+#include <linux/input.h>
+#include <unistd.h>
+
+ struct input_event play;
+ struct input_event stop;
+ struct ff_effect effect;
+ int fd;
+...
+ fd = open("/dev/input/eventXX", O_RDWR);
+...
+ /* Play three times */
+ play.type = EV_FF;
+ play.code = effect.id;
+ play.value = 3;
+
+ write(fd, (const void*) &play, sizeof(play));
+...
+ /* Stop an effect */
+ stop.type = EV_FF;
+ stop.code = effect.id;
+ stop.value = 0;
+
+ write(fd, (const void*) &play, sizeof(stop));
+
+3.5 Setting the gain
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+Not all devices have the same strength. Therefore, users should set a gain
+factor depending on how strong they want effects to be. This setting is
+persistent across access to the driver, so you should not care about it if
+you are writing games, as another utility probably already set this for you.
+
+/* Set the gain of the device
+int gain; /* between 0 and 100 */
+struct input_event ie; /* structure used to communicate with the driver */
+
+ie.type = EV_FF;
+ie.code = FF_GAIN;
+ie.value = 0xFFFFUL * gain / 100;
+
+if (write(fd, &ie, sizeof(ie)) == -1)
+ perror("set gain");
+
+3.6 Enabling/Disabling autocenter
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+The autocenter feature quite disturbs the rendering of effects in my opinion,
+and I think it should be an effect, which computation depends on the game
+type. But you can enable it if you want.
+
+int autocenter; /* between 0 and 100 */
+struct input_event ie;
+
+ie.type = EV_FF;
+ie.code = FF_AUTOCENTER;
+ie.value = 0xFFFFUL * autocenter / 100;
+
+if (write(fd, &ie, sizeof(ie)) == -1)
+ perror("set auto-center");
+
+A value of 0 means "no auto-center".
+
+3.7 Dynamic update of an effect
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+Proceed as if you wanted to upload a new effect, except that instead of
+setting the id field to -1, you set it to the wanted effect id.
+Normally, the effect is not stopped and restarted. However, depending on the
+type of device, not all parameters can be dynamically updated. For example,
+the direction of an effect cannot be updated with iforce devices. In this
+case, the driver stops the effect, up-load it, and restart it.
+
+
+3.8 Information about the status of effects
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+Every time the status of an effect is changed, an event is sent. The values
+and meanings of the fields of the event are as follows:
+struct input_event {
+/* When the status of the effect changed */
+ struct timeval time;
+
+/* Set to EV_FF_STATUS */
+ unsigned short type;
+
+/* Contains the id of the effect */
+ unsigned short code;
+
+/* Indicates the status */
+ unsigned int value;
+};
+
+FF_STATUS_STOPPED The effect stopped playing
+FF_STATUS_PLAYING The effect started to play
diff --git a/Documentation/input/gameport-programming.txt b/Documentation/input/gameport-programming.txt
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..1ba3d322e0ac
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/gameport-programming.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,189 @@
+$Id: gameport-programming.txt,v 1.3 2001/04/24 13:51:37 vojtech Exp $
+
+Programming gameport drivers
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+1. A basic classic gameport
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+If the gameport doesn't provide more than the inb()/outb() functionality,
+the code needed to register it with the joystick drivers is simple:
+
+ struct gameport gameport;
+
+ gameport.io = MY_IO_ADDRESS;
+ gameport_register_port(&gameport);
+
+Make sure struct gameport is initialized to 0 in all other fields. The
+gameport generic code will take care of the rest.
+
+If your hardware supports more than one io address, and your driver can
+choose which one program the hardware to, starting from the more exotic
+addresses is preferred, because the likelyhood of clashing with the standard
+0x201 address is smaller.
+
+Eg. if your driver supports addresses 0x200, 0x208, 0x210 and 0x218, then
+0x218 would be the address of first choice.
+
+If your hardware supports a gameport address that is not mapped to ISA io
+space (is above 0x1000), use that one, and don't map the ISA mirror.
+
+Also, always request_region() on the whole io space occupied by the
+gameport. Although only one ioport is really used, the gameport usually
+occupies from one to sixteen addresses in the io space.
+
+Please also consider enabling the gameport on the card in the ->open()
+callback if the io is mapped to ISA space - this way it'll occupy the io
+space only when something really is using it. Disable it again in the
+->close() callback. You also can select the io address in the ->open()
+callback, so that it doesn't fail if some of the possible addresses are
+already occupied by other gameports.
+
+2. Memory mapped gameport
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+When a gameport can be accessed through MMIO, this way is preferred, because
+it is faster, allowing more reads per second. Registering such a gameport
+isn't as easy as a basic IO one, but not so much complex:
+
+ struct gameport gameport;
+
+ void my_trigger(struct gameport *gameport)
+ {
+ my_mmio = 0xff;
+ }
+
+ unsigned char my_read(struct gameport *gameport)
+ {
+ return my_mmio;
+ }
+
+ gameport.read = my_read;
+ gameport.trigger = my_trigger;
+ gameport_register_port(&gameport);
+
+3. Cooked mode gameport
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+There are gameports that can report the axis values as numbers, that means
+the driver doesn't have to measure them the old way - an ADC is built into
+the gameport. To register a cooked gameport:
+
+ struct gameport gameport;
+
+ int my_cooked_read(struct gameport *gameport, int *axes, int *buttons)
+ {
+ int i;
+
+ for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
+ axes[i] = my_mmio[i];
+ buttons[i] = my_mmio[4];
+ }
+
+ int my_open(struct gameport *gameport, int mode)
+ {
+ return -(mode != GAMEPORT_MODE_COOKED);
+ }
+
+ gameport.cooked_read = my_cooked_read;
+ gameport.open = my_open;
+ gameport.fuzz = 8;
+ gameport_register_port(&gameport);
+
+The only confusing thing here is the fuzz value. Best determined by
+experimentation, it is the amount of noise in the ADC data. Perfect
+gameports can set this to zero, most common have fuzz between 8 and 32.
+See analog.c and input.c for handling of fuzz - the fuzz value determines
+the size of a gaussian filter window that is used to eliminate the noise
+in the data.
+
+4. More complex gameports
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+Gameports can support both raw and cooked modes. In that case combine either
+examples 1+2 or 1+3. Gameports can support internal calibration - see below,
+and also lightning.c and analog.c on how that works. If your driver supports
+more than one gameport instance simultaneously, use the ->private member of
+the gameport struct to point to your data.
+
+5. Unregistering a gameport
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+Simple:
+
+gameport_unregister_port(&gameport);
+
+6. The gameport structure
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+struct gameport {
+
+ void *private;
+
+A private pointer for free use in the gameport driver. (Not the joystick
+driver!)
+
+ int number;
+
+Number assigned to the gameport when registered. Informational purpose only.
+
+ int io;
+
+I/O address for use with raw mode. You have to either set this, or ->read()
+to some value if your gameport supports raw mode.
+
+ int speed;
+
+Raw mode speed of the gameport reads in thousands of reads per second.
+
+ int fuzz;
+
+If the gameport supports cooked mode, this should be set to a value that
+represents the amount of noise in the data. See section 3.
+
+ void (*trigger)(struct gameport *);
+
+Trigger. This function should trigger the ns558 oneshots. If set to NULL,
+outb(0xff, io) will be used.
+
+ unsigned char (*read)(struct gameport *);
+
+Read the buttons and ns558 oneshot bits. If set to NULL, inb(io) will be
+used instead.
+
+ int (*cooked_read)(struct gameport *, int *axes, int *buttons);
+
+If the gameport supports cooked mode, it should point this to its cooked
+read function. It should fill axes[0..3] with four values of the joystick axes
+and buttons[0] with four bits representing the buttons.
+
+ int (*calibrate)(struct gameport *, int *axes, int *max);
+
+Function for calibrating the ADC hardware. When called, axes[0..3] should be
+pre-filled by cooked data by the caller, max[0..3] should be pre-filled with
+expected maximums for each axis. The calibrate() function should set the
+sensitivity of the ADC hardware so that the maximums fit in its range and
+recompute the axes[] values to match the new sensitivity or re-read them from
+the hardware so that they give valid values.
+
+ int (*open)(struct gameport *, int mode);
+
+Open() serves two purposes. First a driver either opens the port in raw or
+in cooked mode, the open() callback can decide which modes are supported.
+Second, resource allocation can happen here. The port can also be enabled
+here. Prior to this call, other fields of the gameport struct (namely the io
+member) need not to be valid.
+
+ void (*close)(struct gameport *);
+
+Close() should free the resources allocated by open, possibly disabling the
+gameport.
+
+ struct gameport_dev *dev;
+ struct gameport *next;
+
+For internal use by the gameport layer.
+
+};
+
+Enjoy!
diff --git a/Documentation/input/iforce-protocol.txt b/Documentation/input/iforce-protocol.txt
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..95df4ca70e71
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/iforce-protocol.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,254 @@
+** Introduction
+This document describes what I managed to discover about the protocol used to
+specify force effects to I-Force 2.0 devices. None of this information comes
+from Immerse. That's why you should not trust what is written in this
+document. This document is intended to help understanding the protocol.
+This is not a reference. Comments and corrections are welcome. To contact me,
+send an email to: deneux@ifrance.com
+
+** WARNING **
+I may not be held responsible for any dammage or harm caused if you try to
+send data to your I-Force device based on what you read in this document.
+
+** Preliminary Notes:
+All values are hexadecimal with big-endian encoding (msb on the left). Beware,
+values inside packets are encoded using little-endian. Bytes whose roles are
+unknown are marked ??? Information that needs deeper inspection is marked (?)
+
+** General form of a packet **
+This is how packets look when the device uses the rs232 to communicate.
+2B OP LEN DATA CS
+CS is the checksum. It is equal to the exclusive or of all bytes.
+
+When using USB:
+OP DATA
+The 2B, LEN and CS fields have disappeared, probably because USB handles frames and
+data corruption is handled or unsignificant.
+
+First, I describe effects that are sent by the device to the computer
+
+** Device input state
+This packet is used to indicate the state of each button and the value of each
+axis
+OP= 01 for a joystick, 03 for a wheel
+LEN= Varies from device to device
+00 X-Axis lsb
+01 X-Axis msb
+02 Y-Axis lsb, or gas pedal for a wheel
+03 Y-Axis msb, or brake pedal for a wheel
+04 Throttle
+05 Buttons
+06 Lower 4 bits: Buttons
+ Upper 4 bits: Hat
+07 Rudder
+
+** Device effects states
+OP= 02
+LEN= Varies
+00 ? Bit 1 (Value 2) is the value of the deadman switch
+01 Bit 8 is set if the effect is playing. Bits 0 to 7 are the effect id.
+02 ??
+03 Address of parameter block changed (lsb)
+04 Address of parameter block changed (msb)
+05 Address of second parameter block changed (lsb)
+... depending on the number of parameter blocks updated
+
+** Force effect **
+OP= 01
+LEN= 0e
+00 Channel (when playing several effects at the same time, each must be assigned a channel)
+01 Wave form
+ Val 00 Constant
+ Val 20 Square
+ Val 21 Triangle
+ Val 22 Sine
+ Val 23 Sawtooth up
+ Val 24 Sawtooth down
+ Val 40 Spring (Force = f(pos))
+ Val 41 Friction (Force = f(velocity)) and Inertia (Force = f(acceleration))
+
+
+02 Axes affected and trigger
+ Bits 4-7: Val 2 = effect along one axis. Byte 05 indicates direction
+ Val 4 = X axis only. Byte 05 must contain 5a
+ Val 8 = Y axis only. Byte 05 must contain b4
+ Val c = X and Y axes. Bytes 05 must contain 60
+ Bits 0-3: Val 0 = No trigger
+ Val x+1 = Button x triggers the effect
+ When the whole byte is 0, cancel the previously set trigger
+
+03-04 Duration of effect (little endian encoding, in ms)
+
+05 Direction of effect, if applicable. Else, see 02 for value to assign.
+
+06-07 Minimum time between triggering.
+
+08-09 Address of periodicity or magnitude parameters
+0a-0b Address of attack and fade parameters, or ffff if none.
+*or*
+08-09 Address of interactive parameters for X-axis, or ffff if not applicable
+0a-0b Address of interactive parameters for Y-axis, or ffff if not applicable
+
+0c-0d Delay before execution of effect (little endian encoding, in ms)
+
+
+** Time based parameters **
+
+*** Attack and fade ***
+OP= 02
+LEN= 08
+00-01 Address where to store the parameteres
+02-03 Duration of attack (little endian encoding, in ms)
+04 Level at end of attack. Signed byte.
+05-06 Duration of fade.
+07 Level at end of fade.
+
+*** Magnitude ***
+OP= 03
+LEN= 03
+00-01 Address
+02 Level. Signed byte.
+
+*** Periodicity ***
+OP= 04
+LEN= 07
+00-01 Address
+02 Magnitude. Signed byte.
+03 Offset. Signed byte.
+04 Phase. Val 00 = 0 deg, Val 40 = 90 degs.
+05-06 Period (little endian encoding, in ms)
+
+** Interactive parameters **
+OP= 05
+LEN= 0a
+00-01 Address
+02 Positive Coeff
+03 Negative Coeff
+04+05 Offset (center)
+06+07 Dead band (Val 01F4 = 5000 (decimal))
+08 Positive saturation (Val 0a = 1000 (decimal) Val 64 = 10000 (decimal))
+09 Negative saturation
+
+The encoding is a bit funny here: For coeffs, these are signed values. The
+maximum value is 64 (100 decimal), the min is 9c.
+For the offset, the minimum value is FE0C, the maximum value is 01F4.
+For the deadband, the minimum value is 0, the max is 03E8.
+
+** Controls **
+OP= 41
+LEN= 03
+00 Channel
+01 Start/Stop
+ Val 00: Stop
+ Val 01: Start and play once.
+ Val 41: Start and play n times (See byte 02 below)
+02 Number of iterations n.
+
+** Init **
+
+*** Querying features ***
+OP= ff
+Query command. Length varies according to the query type.
+The general format of this packet is:
+ff 01 QUERY [INDEX] CHECKSUM
+reponses are of the same form:
+FF LEN QUERY VALUE_QUERIED CHECKSUM2
+where LEN = 1 + length(VALUE_QUERIED)
+
+**** Query ram size ****
+QUERY = 42 ('B'uffer size)
+The device should reply with the same packet plus two additionnal bytes
+containing the size of the memory:
+ff 03 42 03 e8 CS would mean that the device has 1000 bytes of ram available.
+
+**** Query number of effects ****
+QUERY = 4e ('N'umber of effects)
+The device should respond by sending the number of effects that can be played
+at the same time (one byte)
+ff 02 4e 14 CS would stand for 20 effects.
+
+**** Vendor's id ****
+QUERY = 4d ('M'anufacturer)
+Query the vendors'id (2 bytes)
+
+**** Product id *****
+QUERY = 50 ('P'roduct)
+Query the product id (2 bytes)
+
+**** Open device ****
+QUERY = 4f ('O'pen)
+No data returned.
+
+**** Close device *****
+QUERY = 43 ('C')lose
+No data returned.
+
+**** Query effect ****
+QUERY = 45 ('E')
+Send effect type.
+Returns nonzero if supported (2 bytes)
+
+**** Firmware Version ****
+QUERY = 56 ('V'ersion)
+Sends back 3 bytes - major, minor, subminor
+
+*** Initialisation of the device ***
+
+**** Set Control ****
+!!! Device dependent, can be different on different models !!!
+OP= 40 <idx> <val> [<val>]
+LEN= 2 or 3
+00 Idx
+ Idx 00 Set dead zone (0..2048)
+ Idx 01 Ignore Deadman sensor (0..1)
+ Idx 02 Enable comm watchdog (0..1)
+ Idx 03 Set the strength of the spring (0..100)
+ Idx 04 Enable or disable the spring (0/1)
+ Idx 05 Set axis saturation threshold (0..2048)
+
+**** Set Effect State ****
+OP= 42 <val>
+LEN= 1
+00 State
+ Bit 3 Pause force feedback
+ Bit 2 Enable force feedback
+ Bit 0 Stop all effects
+
+**** Set overall gain ****
+OP= 43 <val>
+LEN= 1
+00 Gain
+ Val 00 = 0%
+ Val 40 = 50%
+ Val 80 = 100%
+
+** Parameter memory **
+
+Each device has a certain amount of memory to store parameters of effects.
+The amount of RAM may vary, I encountered values from 200 to 1000 bytes. Below
+is the amount of memory apparently needed for every set of parameters:
+ - period : 0c
+ - magnitude : 02
+ - attack and fade : 0e
+ - interactive : 08
+
+** Appendix: How to study the protocol ? **
+
+1. Generate effects using the force editor provided with the DirectX SDK, or use Immersion Studio (freely available at their web site in the developer section: www.immersion.com)
+2. Start a soft spying RS232 or USB (depending on where you connected your joystick/wheel). I used ComPortSpy from fCoder (alpha version!)
+3. Play the effect, and watch what happens on the spy screen.
+
+A few words about ComPortSpy:
+At first glance, this soft seems, hum, well... buggy. In fact, data appear with a few seconds latency. Personnaly, I restart it every time I play an effect.
+Remember it's free (as in free beer) and alpha!
+
+** URLS **
+Check www.immerse.com for Immersion Studio, and www.fcoder.com for ComPortSpy.
+
+** Author of this document **
+Johann Deneux <deneux@ifrance.com>
+Home page at http://www.esil.univ-mrs.fr/~jdeneux/projects/ff/
+
+Additions by Vojtech Pavlik.
+
+I-Force is trademark of Immersion Corp.
diff --git a/Documentation/input/input-programming.txt b/Documentation/input/input-programming.txt
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..180e0689676c
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/input-programming.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,281 @@
+$Id: input-programming.txt,v 1.4 2001/05/04 09:47:14 vojtech Exp $
+
+Programming input drivers
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+1. Creating an input device driver
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+1.0 The simplest example
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+Here comes a very simple example of an input device driver. The device has
+just one button and the button is accessible at i/o port BUTTON_PORT. When
+pressed or released a BUTTON_IRQ happens. The driver could look like:
+
+#include <linux/input.h>
+#include <linux/module.h>
+#include <linux/init.h>
+
+#include <asm/irq.h>
+#include <asm/io.h>
+
+static void button_interrupt(int irq, void *dummy, struct pt_regs *fp)
+{
+ input_report_key(&button_dev, BTN_1, inb(BUTTON_PORT) & 1);
+ input_sync(&button_dev);
+}
+
+static int __init button_init(void)
+{
+ if (request_irq(BUTTON_IRQ, button_interrupt, 0, "button", NULL)) {
+ printk(KERN_ERR "button.c: Can't allocate irq %d\n", button_irq);
+ return -EBUSY;
+ }
+
+ button_dev.evbit[0] = BIT(EV_KEY);
+ button_dev.keybit[LONG(BTN_0)] = BIT(BTN_0);
+
+ input_register_device(&button_dev);
+}
+
+static void __exit button_exit(void)
+{
+ input_unregister_device(&button_dev);
+ free_irq(BUTTON_IRQ, button_interrupt);
+}
+
+module_init(button_init);
+module_exit(button_exit);
+
+1.1 What the example does
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+First it has to include the <linux/input.h> file, which interfaces to the
+input subsystem. This provides all the definitions needed.
+
+In the _init function, which is called either upon module load or when
+booting the kernel, it grabs the required resources (it should also check
+for the presence of the device).
+
+Then it sets the input bitfields. This way the device driver tells the other
+parts of the input systems what it is - what events can be generated or
+accepted by this input device. Our example device can only generate EV_KEY type
+events, and from those only BTN_0 event code. Thus we only set these two
+bits. We could have used
+
+ set_bit(EV_KEY, button_dev.evbit);
+ set_bit(BTN_0, button_dev.keybit);
+
+as well, but with more than single bits the first approach tends to be
+shorter.
+
+Then the example driver registers the input device structure by calling
+
+ input_register_device(&button_dev);
+
+This adds the button_dev structure to linked lists of the input driver and
+calls device handler modules _connect functions to tell them a new input
+device has appeared. Because the _connect functions may call kmalloc(,
+GFP_KERNEL), which can sleep, input_register_device() must not be called
+from an interrupt or with a spinlock held.
+
+While in use, the only used function of the driver is
+
+ button_interrupt()
+
+which upon every interrupt from the button checks its state and reports it
+via the
+
+ input_report_key()
+
+call to the input system. There is no need to check whether the interrupt
+routine isn't reporting two same value events (press, press for example) to
+the input system, because the input_report_* functions check that
+themselves.
+
+Then there is the
+
+ input_sync()
+
+call to tell those who receive the events that we've sent a complete report.
+This doesn't seem important in the one button case, but is quite important
+for for example mouse movement, where you don't want the X and Y values
+to be interpreted separately, because that'd result in a different movement.
+
+1.2 dev->open() and dev->close()
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+In case the driver has to repeatedly poll the device, because it doesn't
+have an interrupt coming from it and the polling is too expensive to be done
+all the time, or if the device uses a valuable resource (eg. interrupt), it
+can use the open and close callback to know when it can stop polling or
+release the interrupt and when it must resume polling or grab the interrupt
+again. To do that, we would add this to our example driver:
+
+int button_used = 0;
+
+static int button_open(struct input_dev *dev)
+{
+ if (button_used++)
+ return 0;
+
+ if (request_irq(BUTTON_IRQ, button_interrupt, 0, "button", NULL)) {
+ printk(KERN_ERR "button.c: Can't allocate irq %d\n", button_irq);
+ button_used--;
+ return -EBUSY;
+ }
+
+ return 0;
+}
+
+static void button_close(struct input_dev *dev)
+{
+ if (!--button_used)
+ free_irq(IRQ_AMIGA_VERTB, button_interrupt);
+}
+
+static int __init button_init(void)
+{
+ ...
+ button_dev.open = button_open;
+ button_dev.close = button_close;
+ ...
+}
+
+Note the button_used variable - we have to track how many times the open
+function was called to know when exactly our device stops being used.
+
+The open() callback should return a 0 in case of success or any nonzero value
+in case of failure. The close() callback (which is void) must always succeed.
+
+1.3 Basic event types
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The most simple event type is EV_KEY, which is used for keys and buttons.
+It's reported to the input system via:
+
+ input_report_key(struct input_dev *dev, int code, int value)
+
+See linux/input.h for the allowable values of code (from 0 to KEY_MAX).
+Value is interpreted as a truth value, ie any nonzero value means key
+pressed, zero value means key released. The input code generates events only
+in case the value is different from before.
+
+In addition to EV_KEY, there are two more basic event types: EV_REL and
+EV_ABS. They are used for relative and absolute values supplied by the
+device. A relative value may be for example a mouse movement in the X axis.
+The mouse reports it as a relative difference from the last position,
+because it doesn't have any absolute coordinate system to work in. Absolute
+events are namely for joysticks and digitizers - devices that do work in an
+absolute coordinate systems.
+
+Having the device report EV_REL buttons is as simple as with EV_KEY, simply
+set the corresponding bits and call the
+
+ input_report_rel(struct input_dev *dev, int code, int value)
+
+function. Events are generated only for nonzero value.
+
+However EV_ABS requires a little special care. Before calling
+input_register_device, you have to fill additional fields in the input_dev
+struct for each absolute axis your device has. If our button device had also
+the ABS_X axis:
+
+ button_dev.absmin[ABS_X] = 0;
+ button_dev.absmax[ABS_X] = 255;
+ button_dev.absfuzz[ABS_X] = 4;
+ button_dev.absflat[ABS_X] = 8;
+
+This setting would be appropriate for a joystick X axis, with the minimum of
+0, maximum of 255 (which the joystick *must* be able to reach, no problem if
+it sometimes reports more, but it must be able to always reach the min and
+max values), with noise in the data up to +- 4, and with a center flat
+position of size 8.
+
+If you don't need absfuzz and absflat, you can set them to zero, which mean
+that the thing is precise and always returns to exactly the center position
+(if it has any).
+
+1.4 The void *private field
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+This field in the input structure can be used to point to any private data
+structures in the input device driver, in case the driver handles more than
+one device. You'll need it in the open and close callbacks.
+
+1.5 NBITS(), LONG(), BIT()
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+These three macros from input.h help some bitfield computations:
+
+ NBITS(x) - returns the length of a bitfield array in longs for x bits
+ LONG(x) - returns the index in the array in longs for bit x
+ BIT(x) - returns the index in a long for bit x
+
+1.6 The number, id* and name fields
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The dev->number is assigned by the input system to the input device when it
+is registered. It has no use except for identifying the device to the user
+in system messages.
+
+The dev->name should be set before registering the input device by the input
+device driver. It's a string like 'Generic button device' containing a
+user friendly name of the device.
+
+The id* fields contain the bus ID (PCI, USB, ...), vendor ID and device ID
+of the device. The bus IDs are defined in input.h. The vendor and device ids
+are defined in pci_ids.h, usb_ids.h and similar include files. These fields
+should be set by the input device driver before registering it.
+
+The idtype field can be used for specific information for the input device
+driver.
+
+The id and name fields can be passed to userland via the evdev interface.
+
+1.7 The keycode, keycodemax, keycodesize fields
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+These two fields will be used for any input devices that report their data
+as scancodes. If not all scancodes can be known by autodetection, they may
+need to be set by userland utilities. The keycode array then is an array
+used to map from scancodes to input system keycodes. The keycode max will
+contain the size of the array and keycodesize the size of each entry in it
+(in bytes).
+
+1.8 Key autorepeat
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+... is simple. It is handled by the input.c module. Hardware autorepeat is
+not used, because it's not present in many devices and even where it is
+present, it is broken sometimes (at keyboards: Toshiba notebooks). To enable
+autorepeat for your device, just set EV_REP in dev->evbit. All will be
+handled by the input system.
+
+1.9 Other event types, handling output events
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The other event types up to now are:
+
+EV_LED - used for the keyboard LEDs.
+EV_SND - used for keyboard beeps.
+
+They are very similar to for example key events, but they go in the other
+direction - from the system to the input device driver. If your input device
+driver can handle these events, it has to set the respective bits in evbit,
+*and* also the callback routine:
+
+ button_dev.event = button_event;
+
+int button_event(struct input_dev *dev, unsigned int type, unsigned int code, int value);
+{
+ if (type == EV_SND && code == SND_BELL) {
+ outb(value, BUTTON_BELL);
+ return 0;
+ }
+ return -1;
+}
+
+This callback routine can be called from an interrupt or a BH (although that
+isn't a rule), and thus must not sleep, and must not take too long to finish.
diff --git a/Documentation/input/input.txt b/Documentation/input/input.txt
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..47137e75fdb8
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/input.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,312 @@
+ Linux Input drivers v1.0
+ (c) 1999-2001 Vojtech Pavlik <vojtech@ucw.cz>
+ Sponsored by SuSE
+ $Id: input.txt,v 1.8 2002/05/29 03:15:01 bradleym Exp $
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+0. Disclaimer
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
+under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free
+Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at your option)
+any later version.
+
+ This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
+WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY
+or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for
+more details.
+
+ You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along
+with this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59
+Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA
+
+ Should you need to contact me, the author, you can do so either by e-mail
+- mail your message to <vojtech@ucw.cz>, or by paper mail: Vojtech Pavlik,
+Simunkova 1594, Prague 8, 182 00 Czech Republic
+
+ For your convenience, the GNU General Public License version 2 is included
+in the package: See the file COPYING.
+
+1. Introduction
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ This is a collection of drivers that is designed to support all input
+devices under Linux. While it is currently used only on for USB input
+devices, future use (say 2.5/2.6) is expected to expand to replace
+most of the existing input system, which is why it lives in
+drivers/input/ instead of drivers/usb/.
+
+ The centre of the input drivers is the input module, which must be
+loaded before any other of the input modules - it serves as a way of
+communication between two groups of modules:
+
+1.1 Device drivers
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ These modules talk to the hardware (for example via USB), and provide
+events (keystrokes, mouse movements) to the input module.
+
+1.2 Event handlers
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ These modules get events from input and pass them where needed via
+various interfaces - keystrokes to the kernel, mouse movements via a
+simulated PS/2 interface to GPM and X and so on.
+
+2. Simple Usage
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ For the most usual configuration, with one USB mouse and one USB keyboard,
+you'll have to load the following modules (or have them built in to the
+kernel):
+
+ input
+ mousedev
+ keybdev
+ usbcore
+ uhci_hcd or ohci_hcd or ehci_hcd
+ usbhid
+
+ After this, the USB keyboard will work straight away, and the USB mouse
+will be available as a character device on major 13, minor 63:
+
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 63 Mar 28 22:45 mice
+
+ This device has to be created, unless you use devfs, in which case it's
+created automatically. The commands to do create it by hand are:
+
+ cd /dev
+ mkdir input
+ mknod input/mice c 13 63
+
+ After that you have to point GPM (the textmode mouse cut&paste tool) and
+XFree to this device to use it - GPM should be called like:
+
+ gpm -t ps2 -m /dev/input/mice
+
+ And in X:
+
+ Section "Pointer"
+ Protocol "ImPS/2"
+ Device "/dev/input/mice"
+ ZAxisMapping 4 5
+ EndSection
+
+ When you do all of the above, you can use your USB mouse and keyboard.
+
+3. Detailed Description
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+3.1 Device drivers
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Device drivers are the modules that generate events. The events are
+however not useful without being handled, so you also will need to use some
+of the modules from section 3.2.
+
+3.1.1 usbhid
+~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ usbhid is the largest and most complex driver of the whole suite. It
+handles all HID devices, and because there is a very wide variety of them,
+and because the USB HID specification isn't simple, it needs to be this big.
+
+ Currently, it handles USB mice, joysticks, gamepads, steering wheels
+keyboards, trackballs and digitizers.
+
+ However, USB uses HID also for monitor controls, speaker controls, UPSs,
+LCDs and many other purposes.
+
+ The monitor and speaker controls should be easy to add to the hid/input
+interface, but for the UPSs and LCDs it doesn't make much sense. For this,
+the hiddev interface was designed. See Documentation/usb/hiddev.txt
+for more information about it.
+
+ The usage of the usbhid module is very simple, it takes no parameters,
+detects everything automatically and when a HID device is inserted, it
+detects it appropriately.
+
+ However, because the devices vary wildly, you might happen to have a
+device that doesn't work well. In that case #define DEBUG at the beginning
+of hid-core.c and send me the syslog traces.
+
+3.1.2 usbmouse
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ For embedded systems, for mice with broken HID descriptors and just any
+other use when the big usbhid wouldn't be a good choice, there is the
+usbmouse driver. It handles USB mice only. It uses a simpler HIDBP
+protocol. This also means the mice must support this simpler protocol. Not
+all do. If you don't have any strong reason to use this module, use usbhid
+instead.
+
+3.1.3 usbkbd
+~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Much like usbmouse, this module talks to keyboards with a simplified
+HIDBP protocol. It's smaller, but doesn't support any extra special keys.
+Use usbhid instead if there isn't any special reason to use this.
+
+3.1.4 wacom
+~~~~~~~~~~~
+ This is a driver for Wacom Graphire and Intuos tablets. Not for Wacom
+PenPartner, that one is handled by the HID driver. Although the Intuos and
+Graphire tablets claim that they are HID tablets as well, they are not and
+thus need this specific driver.
+
+3.1.5 iforce
+~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ A driver for I-Force joysticks and wheels, both over USB and RS232.
+It includes ForceFeedback support now, even though Immersion
+Corp. considers the protocol a trade secret and won't disclose a word
+about it.
+
+3.2 Event handlers
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Event handlers distrubite the events from the devices to userland and
+kernel, as needed.
+
+3.2.1 keybdev
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ keybdev is currently a rather ugly hack that translates the input
+events into architecture-specific keyboard raw mode (Xlated AT Set2 on
+x86), and passes them into the handle_scancode function of the
+keyboard.c module. This works well enough on all architectures that
+keybdev can generate rawmode on, other architectures can be added to
+it.
+
+ The right way would be to pass the events to keyboard.c directly,
+best if keyboard.c would itself be an event handler. This is done in
+the input patch, available on the webpage mentioned below.
+
+3.2.2 mousedev
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ mousedev is also a hack to make programs that use mouse input
+work. It takes events from either mice or digitizers/tablets and makes
+a PS/2-style (a la /dev/psaux) mouse device available to the
+userland. Ideally, the programs could use a more reasonable interface,
+for example evdev
+
+ Mousedev devices in /dev/input (as shown above) are:
+
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 32 Mar 28 22:45 mouse0
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 33 Mar 29 00:41 mouse1
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 34 Mar 29 00:41 mouse2
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 35 Apr 1 10:50 mouse3
+ ...
+ ...
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 62 Apr 1 10:50 mouse30
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 63 Apr 1 10:50 mice
+
+Each 'mouse' device is assigned to a single mouse or digitizer, except
+the last one - 'mice'. This single character device is shared by all
+mice and digitizers, and even if none are connected, the device is
+present. This is useful for hotplugging USB mice, so that programs
+can open the device even when no mice are present.
+
+ CONFIG_INPUT_MOUSEDEV_SCREEN_[XY] in the kernel configuration are
+the size of your screen (in pixels) in XFree86. This is needed if you
+want to use your digitizer in X, because its movement is sent to X
+via a virtual PS/2 mouse and thus needs to be scaled
+accordingly. These values won't be used if you use a mouse only.
+
+ Mousedev will generate either PS/2, ImPS/2 (Microsoft IntelliMouse) or
+ExplorerPS/2 (IntelliMouse Explorer) protocols, depending on what the
+program reading the data wishes. You can set GPM and X to any of
+these. You'll need ImPS/2 if you want to make use of a wheel on a USB
+mouse and ExplorerPS/2 if you want to use extra (up to 5) buttons.
+
+3.2.3 joydev
+~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Joydev implements v0.x and v1.x Linux joystick api, much like
+drivers/char/joystick/joystick.c used to in earlier versions. See
+joystick-api.txt in the Documentation subdirectory for details. As
+soon as any joystick is connected, it can be accessed in /dev/input
+on:
+
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 0 Apr 1 10:50 js0
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 1 Apr 1 10:50 js1
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 2 Apr 1 10:50 js2
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 3 Apr 1 10:50 js3
+ ...
+
+And so on up to js31.
+
+3.2.4 evdev
+~~~~~~~~~~~
+ evdev is the generic input event interface. It passes the events
+generated in the kernel straight to the program, with timestamps. The
+API is still evolving, but should be useable now. It's described in
+section 5.
+
+ This should be the way for GPM and X to get keyboard and mouse mouse
+events. It allows for multihead in X without any specific multihead
+kernel support. The event codes are the same on all architectures and
+are hardware independent.
+
+ The devices are in /dev/input:
+
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 64 Apr 1 10:49 event0
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 65 Apr 1 10:50 event1
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 66 Apr 1 10:50 event2
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 13, 67 Apr 1 10:50 event3
+ ...
+
+And so on up to event31.
+
+4. Verifying if it works
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Typing a couple keys on the keyboard should be enough to check that
+a USB keyboard works and is correctly connected to the kernel keyboard
+driver.
+
+ Doing a cat /dev/input/mouse0 (c, 13, 32) will verify that a mouse
+is also emulated, characters should appear if you move it.
+
+ You can test the joystick emulation with the 'jstest' utility,
+available in the joystick package (see Documentation/input/joystick.txt).
+
+ You can test the event devices with the 'evtest' utility available
+in the LinuxConsole project CVS archive (see the URL below).
+
+5. Event interface
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Should you want to add event device support into any application (X, gpm,
+svgalib ...) I <vojtech@ucw.cz> will be happy to provide you any help I
+can. Here goes a description of the current state of things, which is going
+to be extended, but not changed incompatibly as time goes:
+
+ You can use blocking and nonblocking reads, also select() on the
+/dev/input/eventX devices, and you'll always get a whole number of input
+events on a read. Their layout is:
+
+struct input_event {
+ struct timeval time;
+ unsigned short type;
+ unsigned short code;
+ unsigned int value;
+};
+
+ 'time' is the timestamp, it returns the time at which the event happened.
+Type is for example EV_REL for relative momement, REL_KEY for a keypress or
+release. More types are defined in include/linux/input.h.
+
+ 'code' is event code, for example REL_X or KEY_BACKSPACE, again a complete
+list is in include/linux/input.h.
+
+ 'value' is the value the event carries. Either a relative change for
+EV_REL, absolute new value for EV_ABS (joysticks ...), or 0 for EV_KEY for
+release, 1 for keypress and 2 for autorepeat.
+
+6. Contacts
+~~~~~~~~~~~
+ This effort has its home page at:
+
+ http://www.suse.cz/development/input/
+
+You'll find both the latest HID driver and the complete Input driver
+there as well as information how to access the CVS repository for
+latest revisions of the drivers.
+
+ There is also a mailing list for this:
+
+ majordomo@atrey.karlin.mff.cuni.cz
+
+Send "subscribe linux-input" to subscribe to it.
+
+The input changes are also being worked on as part of the LinuxConsole
+project, see:
+
+ http://sourceforge.net/projects/linuxconsole/
+
diff --git a/Documentation/input/interactive.fig b/Documentation/input/interactive.fig
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..1e7de387723a
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/interactive.fig
@@ -0,0 +1,42 @@
+#FIG 3.2
+Landscape
+Center
+Inches
+Letter
+100.00
+Single
+-2
+1200 2
+2 1 0 2 0 7 50 0 -1 6.000 0 0 -1 0 0 6
+ 1200 3600 1800 3600 2400 4800 3000 4800 4200 5700 4800 5700
+2 2 0 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 5
+ 1200 3150 4800 3150 4800 6300 1200 6300 1200 3150
+2 1 0 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 2
+ 1200 4800 4800 4800
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 4
+ 2400 4800 2400 6525 1950 7125 1950 7800
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 4
+ 3000 4800 3000 6525 3600 7125 3600 7800
+2 1 0 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 1 3
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 3825 5400 4125 5100 5400 5100
+2 1 0 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 1 3
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 2100 4200 2400 3900 5400 3900
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 2
+ 4800 5700 5400 5700
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 2
+ 1800 3600 5400 3600
+2 1 0 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 1 3
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 2700 4800 2700 4425 5400 4425
+2 1 0 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 1 1 2
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 1950 7800 3600 7800
+4 1 0 50 0 0 12 0.0000 4 135 810 2775 7725 Dead band\001
+4 0 0 50 0 0 12 0.0000 4 180 1155 5400 5700 right saturation\001
+4 0 0 50 0 0 12 0.0000 4 135 1065 5400 3600 left saturation\001
+4 0 0 50 0 0 12 0.0000 4 180 2505 5400 3900 left coeff ( positive in that case )\001
+4 0 0 50 0 0 12 0.0000 4 180 2640 5475 5100 right coeff ( negative in that case )\001
+4 0 0 50 0 0 12 0.0000 4 105 480 5400 4425 center\001
diff --git a/Documentation/input/joystick-api.txt b/Documentation/input/joystick-api.txt
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..acbd32b88454
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/joystick-api.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,316 @@
+ Joystick API Documentation -*-Text-*-
+
+ Ragnar Hojland Espinosa
+ <ragnar@macula.net>
+
+ 7 Aug 1998
+
+ $Id: joystick-api.txt,v 1.2 2001/05/08 21:21:23 vojtech Exp $
+
+1. Initialization
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+Open the joystick device following the usual semantics (that is, with open).
+Since the driver now reports events instead of polling for changes,
+immediately after the open it will issue a series of synthetic events
+(JS_EVENT_INIT) that you can read to check the initial state of the
+joystick.
+
+By default, the device is opened in blocking mode.
+
+ int fd = open ("/dev/js0", O_RDONLY);
+
+
+2. Event Reading
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+ struct js_event e;
+ read (fd, &e, sizeof(struct js_event));
+
+where js_event is defined as
+
+ struct js_event {
+ __u32 time; /* event timestamp in milliseconds */
+ __s16 value; /* value */
+ __u8 type; /* event type */
+ __u8 number; /* axis/button number */
+ };
+
+If the read is successful, it will return sizeof(struct js_event), unless
+you wanted to read more than one event per read as described in section 3.1.
+
+
+2.1 js_event.type
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The possible values of ``type'' are
+
+ #define JS_EVENT_BUTTON 0x01 /* button pressed/released */
+ #define JS_EVENT_AXIS 0x02 /* joystick moved */
+ #define JS_EVENT_INIT 0x80 /* initial state of device */
+
+As mentioned above, the driver will issue synthetic JS_EVENT_INIT ORed
+events on open. That is, if it's issuing a INIT BUTTON event, the
+current type value will be
+
+ int type = JS_EVENT_BUTTON | JS_EVENT_INIT; /* 0x81 */
+
+If you choose not to differentiate between synthetic or real events
+you can turn off the JS_EVENT_INIT bits
+
+ type &= ~JS_EVENT_INIT; /* 0x01 */
+
+
+2.2 js_event.number
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The values of ``number'' correspond to the axis or button that
+generated the event. Note that they carry separate numeration (that
+is, you have both an axis 0 and a button 0). Generally,
+
+ number
+ 1st Axis X 0
+ 1st Axis Y 1
+ 2nd Axis X 2
+ 2nd Axis Y 3
+ ...and so on
+
+Hats vary from one joystick type to another. Some can be moved in 8
+directions, some only in 4, The driver, however, always reports a hat as two
+independent axis, even if the hardware doesn't allow independent movement.
+
+
+2.3 js_event.value
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+For an axis, ``value'' is a signed integer between -32767 and +32767
+representing the position of the joystick along that axis. If you
+don't read a 0 when the joystick is `dead', or if it doesn't span the
+full range, you should recalibrate it (with, for example, jscal).
+
+For a button, ``value'' for a press button event is 1 and for a release
+button event is 0.
+
+Though this
+
+ if (js_event.type == JS_EVENT_BUTTON) {
+ buttons_state ^= (1 << js_event.number);
+ }
+
+may work well if you handle JS_EVENT_INIT events separately,
+
+ if ((js_event.type & ~JS_EVENT_INIT) == JS_EVENT_BUTTON) {
+ if (js_event.value)
+ buttons_state |= (1 << js_event.number);
+ else
+ buttons_state &= ~(1 << js_event.number);
+ }
+
+is much safer since it can't lose sync with the driver. As you would
+have to write a separate handler for JS_EVENT_INIT events in the first
+snippet, this ends up being shorter.
+
+
+2.4 js_event.time
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The time an event was generated is stored in ``js_event.time''. It's a time
+in milliseconds since ... well, since sometime in the past. This eases the
+task of detecting double clicks, figuring out if movement of axis and button
+presses happened at the same time, and similar.
+
+
+3. Reading
+~~~~~~~~~~
+
+If you open the device in blocking mode, a read will block (that is,
+wait) forever until an event is generated and effectively read. There
+are two alternatives if you can't afford to wait forever (which is,
+admittedly, a long time;)
+
+ a) use select to wait until there's data to be read on fd, or
+ until it timeouts. There's a good example on the select(2)
+ man page.
+
+ b) open the device in non-blocking mode (O_NONBLOCK)
+
+
+3.1 O_NONBLOCK
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+If read returns -1 when reading in O_NONBLOCK mode, this isn't
+necessarily a "real" error (check errno(3)); it can just mean there
+are no events pending to be read on the driver queue. You should read
+all events on the queue (that is, until you get a -1).
+
+For example,
+
+ while (1) {
+ while (read (fd, &e, sizeof(struct js_event)) > 0) {
+ process_event (e);
+ }
+ /* EAGAIN is returned when the queue is empty */
+ if (errno != EAGAIN) {
+ /* error */
+ }
+ /* do something interesting with processed events */
+ }
+
+One reason for emptying the queue is that if it gets full you'll start
+missing events since the queue is finite, and older events will get
+overwritten.
+
+The other reason is that you want to know all what happened, and not
+delay the processing till later.
+
+Why can get the queue full? Because you don't empty the queue as
+mentioned, or because too much time elapses from one read to another
+and too many events to store in the queue get generated. Note that
+high system load may contribute to space those reads even more.
+
+If time between reads is enough to fill the queue and lose an event,
+the driver will switch to startup mode and next time you read it,
+synthetic events (JS_EVENT_INIT) will be generated to inform you of
+the actual state of the joystick.
+
+[As for version 1.2.8, the queue is circular and able to hold 64
+ events. You can increment this size bumping up JS_BUFF_SIZE in
+ joystick.h and recompiling the driver.]
+
+
+In the above code, you might as well want to read more than one event
+at a time using the typical read(2) functionality. For that, you would
+replace the read above with something like
+
+ struct js_event mybuffer[0xff];
+ int i = read (fd, mybuffer, sizeof(struct mybuffer));
+
+In this case, read would return -1 if the queue was empty, or some
+other value in which the number of events read would be i /
+sizeof(js_event) Again, if the buffer was full, it's a good idea to
+process the events and keep reading it until you empty the driver queue.
+
+
+4. IOCTLs
+~~~~~~~~~
+
+The joystick driver defines the following ioctl(2) operations.
+
+ /* function 3rd arg */
+ #define JSIOCGAXES /* get number of axes char */
+ #define JSIOCGBUTTONS /* get number of buttons char */
+ #define JSIOCGVERSION /* get driver version int */
+ #define JSIOCGNAME(len) /* get identifier string char */
+ #define JSIOCSCORR /* set correction values &js_corr */
+ #define JSIOCGCORR /* get correction values &js_corr */
+
+For example, to read the number of axes
+
+ char number_of_axes;
+ ioctl (fd, JSIOCGAXES, &number_of_axes);
+
+
+4.1 JSIOGCVERSION
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+JSIOGCVERSION is a good way to check in run-time whether the running
+driver is 1.0+ and supports the event interface. If it is not, the
+IOCTL will fail. For a compile-time decision, you can test the
+JS_VERSION symbol
+
+ #ifdef JS_VERSION
+ #if JS_VERSION > 0xsomething
+
+
+4.2 JSIOCGNAME
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+JSIOCGNAME(len) allows you to get the name string of the joystick - the same
+as is being printed at boot time. The 'len' argument is the length of the
+buffer provided by the application asking for the name. It is used to avoid
+possible overrun should the name be too long.
+
+ char name[128];
+ if (ioctl(fd, JSIOCGNAME(sizeof(name)), name) < 0)
+ strncpy(name, "Unknown", sizeof(name));
+ printf("Name: %s\n", name);
+
+
+4.3 JSIOC[SG]CORR
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+For usage on JSIOC[SG]CORR I suggest you to look into jscal.c They are
+not needed in a normal program, only in joystick calibration software
+such as jscal or kcmjoy. These IOCTLs and data types aren't considered
+to be in the stable part of the API, and therefore may change without
+warning in following releases of the driver.
+
+Both JSIOCSCORR and JSIOCGCORR expect &js_corr to be able to hold
+information for all axis. That is, struct js_corr corr[MAX_AXIS];
+
+struct js_corr is defined as
+
+ struct js_corr {
+ __s32 coef[8];
+ __u16 prec;
+ __u16 type;
+ };
+
+and ``type''
+
+ #define JS_CORR_NONE 0x00 /* returns raw values */
+ #define JS_CORR_BROKEN 0x01 /* broken line */
+
+
+5. Backward compatibility
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+The 0.x joystick driver API is quite limited and its usage is deprecated.
+The driver offers backward compatibility, though. Here's a quick summary:
+
+ struct JS_DATA_TYPE js;
+ while (1) {
+ if (read (fd, &js, JS_RETURN) != JS_RETURN) {
+ /* error */
+ }
+ usleep (1000);
+ }
+
+As you can figure out from the example, the read returns immediately,
+with the actual state of the joystick.
+
+ struct JS_DATA_TYPE {
+ int buttons; /* immediate button state */
+ int x; /* immediate x axis value */
+ int y; /* immediate y axis value */
+ };
+
+and JS_RETURN is defined as
+
+ #define JS_RETURN sizeof(struct JS_DATA_TYPE)
+
+To test the state of the buttons,
+
+ first_button_state = js.buttons & 1;
+ second_button_state = js.buttons & 2;
+
+The axis values do not have a defined range in the original 0.x driver,
+except for that the values are non-negative. The 1.2.8+ drivers use a
+fixed range for reporting the values, 1 being the minimum, 128 the
+center, and 255 maximum value.
+
+The v0.8.0.2 driver also had an interface for 'digital joysticks', (now
+called Multisystem joysticks in this driver), under /dev/djsX. This driver
+doesn't try to be compatible with that interface.
+
+
+6. Final Notes
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+____/| Comments, additions, and specially corrections are welcome.
+\ o.O| Documentation valid for at least version 1.2.8 of the joystick
+ =(_)= driver and as usual, the ultimate source for documentation is
+ U to "Use The Source Luke" or, at your convenience, Vojtech ;)
+
+ - Ragnar
+EOF
diff --git a/Documentation/input/joystick-parport.txt b/Documentation/input/joystick-parport.txt
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..88a011c9f985
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/joystick-parport.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,542 @@
+ Linux Joystick parport drivers v2.0
+ (c) 1998-2000 Vojtech Pavlik <vojtech@ucw.cz>
+ (c) 1998 Andree Borrmann <a.borrmann@tu-bs.de>
+ Sponsored by SuSE
+ $Id: joystick-parport.txt,v 1.6 2001/09/25 09:31:32 vojtech Exp $
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+0. Disclaimer
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Any information in this file is provided as-is, without any guarantee that
+it will be true. So, use it at your own risk. The possible damages that can
+happen include burning your parallel port, and/or the sticks and joystick
+and maybe even more. Like when a lightning kills you it is not our problem.
+
+1. Intro
+~~~~~~~~
+ The joystick parport drivers are used for joysticks and gamepads not
+originally designed for PCs and other computers Linux runs on. Because of
+that, PCs usually lack the right ports to connect these devices to. Parallel
+port, because of its ability to change single bits at will, and providing
+both output and input bits is the most suitable port on the PC for
+connecting such devices.
+
+2. Devices supported
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Many console and 8-bit computer gamepads and joysticks are supported. The
+following subsections discuss usage of each.
+
+2.1 NES and SNES
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The Nintendo Entertainment System and Super Nintendo Entertainment System
+gamepads are widely available, and easy to get. Also, they are quite easy to
+connect to a PC, and don't need much processing speed (108 us for NES and
+165 us for SNES, compared to about 1000 us for PC gamepads) to communicate
+with them.
+
+ All NES and SNES use the same synchronous serial protocol, clocked from
+the computer's side (and thus timing insensitive). To allow up to 5 NES
+and/or SNES gamepads connected to the parallel port at once, the output
+lines of the parallel port are shared, while one of 5 available input lines
+is assigned to each gamepad.
+
+ This protocol is handled by the gamecon.c driver, so that's the one
+you'll use for NES and SNES gamepads.
+
+ The main problem with PC parallel ports is that they don't have +5V power
+source on any of their pins. So, if you want a reliable source of power
+for your pads, use either keyboard or joystick port, and make a pass-through
+cable. You can also pull the power directly from the power supply (the red
+wire is +5V).
+
+ If you want to use the parallel port only, you can take the power is from
+some data pin. For most gamepad and parport implementations only one pin is
+needed, and I'd recommend pin 9 for that, the highest data bit. On the other
+hand, if you are not planning to use anything else than NES / SNES on the
+port, anything between and including pin 4 and pin 9 will work.
+
+(pin 9) -----> Power
+
+ Unfortunately, there are pads that need a lot more of power, and parallel
+ports that can't give much current through the data pins. If this is your
+case, you'll need to use diodes (as a prevention of destroying your parallel
+port), and combine the currents of two or more data bits together.
+
+ Diodes
+(pin 9) ----|>|-------+------> Power
+ |
+(pin 8) ----|>|-------+
+ |
+(pin 7) ----|>|-------+
+ |
+ <and so on> :
+ |
+(pin 4) ----|>|-------+
+
+ Ground is quite easy. On PC's parallel port the ground is on any of the
+pins from pin 18 to pin 25. So use any pin of these you like for the ground.
+
+(pin 18) -----> Ground
+
+ NES and SNES pads have two input bits, Clock and Latch, which drive the
+serial transfer. These are connected to pins 2 and 3 of the parallel port,
+respectively.
+
+(pin 2) -----> Clock
+(pin 3) -----> Latch
+
+ And the last thing is the NES / SNES data wire. Only that isn't shared and
+each pad needs its own data pin. The parallel port pins are:
+
+(pin 10) -----> Pad 1 data
+(pin 11) -----> Pad 2 data
+(pin 12) -----> Pad 3 data
+(pin 13) -----> Pad 4 data
+(pin 15) -----> Pad 5 data
+
+ Note that pin 14 is not used, since it is not an input pin on the parallel
+port.
+
+ This is everything you need on the PC's side of the connection, now on to
+the gamepads side. The NES and SNES have different connectors. Also, there
+are quite a lot of NES clones, and because Nintendo used proprietary
+connectors for their machines, the cloners couldn't and used standard D-Cannon
+connectors. Anyway, if you've got a gamepad, and it has buttons A, B, Turbo
+A, Turbo B, Select and Start, and is connected through 5 wires, then it is
+either a NES or NES clone and will work with this connection. SNES gamepads
+also use 5 wires, but have more buttons. They will work as well, of course.
+
+Pinout for NES gamepads Pinout for SNES gamepads
+
+ +----> Power +-----------------------\
+ | 7 | o o o o | x x o | 1
+ 5 +---------+ 7 +-----------------------/
+ | x x o \ | | | | |
+ | o o o o | | | | | +-> Ground
+ 4 +------------+ 1 | | | +------------> Data
+ | | | | | | +---------------> Latch
+ | | | +-> Ground | +------------------> Clock
+ | | +----> Clock +---------------------> Power
+ | +-------> Latch
+ +----------> Data
+
+Pinout for NES clone (db9) gamepads Pinout for NES clone (db15) gamepads
+
+ +---------> Clock +-----------------> Data
+ | +-------> Latch | +---> Ground
+ | | +-----> Data | |
+ | | | ___________________
+ _____________ 8 \ o x x x x x x o / 1
+ 5 \ x o o o x / 1 \ o x x o x x o /
+ \ x o x o / 15 `~~~~~~~~~~~~~' 9
+ 9 `~~~~~~~' 6 | | |
+ | | | | +----> Clock
+ | +----> Power | +----------> Latch
+ +--------> Ground +----------------> Power
+
+2.2 Multisystem joysticks
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ In the era of 8-bit machines, there was something like de-facto standard
+for joystick ports. They were all digital, and all used D-Cannon 9 pin
+connectors (db9). Because of that, a single joystick could be used without
+hassle on Atari (130, 800XE, 800XL, 2600, 7200), Amiga, Commodore C64,
+Amstrad CPC, Sinclair ZX Spectrum and many other machines. That's why these
+joysticks are called "Multisystem".
+
+ Now their pinout:
+
+ +---------> Right
+ | +-------> Left
+ | | +-----> Down
+ | | | +---> Up
+ | | | |
+ _____________
+5 \ x o o o o / 1
+ \ x o x o /
+ 9 `~~~~~~~' 6
+ | |
+ | +----> Button
+ +--------> Ground
+
+ However, as time passed, extensions to this standard developed, and these
+were not compatible with each other:
+
+
+ Atari 130, 800/XL/XE MSX
+
+ +-----------> Power
+ +---------> Right | +---------> Right
+ | +-------> Left | | +-------> Left
+ | | +-----> Down | | | +-----> Down
+ | | | +---> Up | | | | +---> Up
+ | | | | | | | | |
+ _____________ _____________
+5 \ x o o o o / 1 5 \ o o o o o / 1
+ \ x o o o / \ o o o o /
+ 9 `~~~~~~~' 6 9 `~~~~~~~' 6
+ | | | | | | |
+ | | +----> Button | | | +----> Button 1
+ | +------> Power | | +------> Button 2
+ +--------> Ground | +--------> Output 3
+ +----------> Ground
+
+ Amstrad CPC Commodore C64
+
+ +-----------> Analog Y
+ +---------> Right | +---------> Right
+ | +-------> Left | | +-------> Left
+ | | +-----> Down | | | +-----> Down
+ | | | +---> Up | | | | +---> Up
+ | | | | | | | | |
+ _____________ _____________
+5 \ x o o o o / 1 5 \ o o o o o / 1
+ \ x o o o / \ o o o o /
+ 9 `~~~~~~~' 6 9 `~~~~~~~' 6
+ | | | | | | |
+ | | +----> Button 1 | | | +----> Button
+ | +------> Button 2 | | +------> Power
+ +--------> Ground | +--------> Ground
+ +----------> Analog X
+
+ Sinclair Spectrum +2A/+3 Amiga 1200
+
+ +-----------> Up +-----------> Button 3
+ | +---------> Fire | +---------> Right
+ | | | | +-------> Left
+ | | +-----> Ground | | | +-----> Down
+ | | | | | | | +---> Up
+ | | | | | | | |
+ _____________ _____________
+5 \ o o x o x / 1 5 \ o o o o o / 1
+ \ o o o o / \ o o o o /
+ 9 `~~~~~~~' 6 9 `~~~~~~~' 6
+ | | | | | | | |
+ | | | +----> Right | | | +----> Button 1
+ | | +------> Left | | +------> Power
+ | +--------> Ground | +--------> Ground
+ +----------> Down +----------> Button 2
+
+ And there were many others.
+
+2.2.1 Multisystem joysticks using db9.c
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ For the Multisystem joysticks, and their derivatives, the db9.c driver
+was written. It allows only one joystick / gamepad per parallel port, but
+the interface is easy to build and works with almost anything.
+
+ For the basic 1-button Multisystem joystick you connect its wires to the
+parallel port like this:
+
+(pin 1) -----> Power
+(pin 18) -----> Ground
+
+(pin 2) -----> Up
+(pin 3) -----> Down
+(pin 4) -----> Left
+(pin 5) -----> Right
+(pin 6) -----> Button 1
+
+ However, if the joystick is switch based (eg. clicks when you move it),
+you might or might not, depending on your parallel port, need 10 kOhm pullup
+resistors on each of the direction and button signals, like this:
+
+(pin 2) ------------+------> Up
+ Resistor |
+(pin 1) --[10kOhm]--+
+
+ Try without, and if it doesn't work, add them. For TTL based joysticks /
+gamepads the pullups are not needed.
+
+ For joysticks with two buttons you connect the second button to pin 7 on
+the parallel port.
+
+(pin 7) -----> Button 2
+
+ And that's it.
+
+ On a side note, if you have already built a different adapter for use with
+the digital joystick driver 0.8.0.2, this is also supported by the db9.c
+driver, as device type 8. (See section 3.2)
+
+2.2.2 Multisystem joysticks using gamecon.c
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ For some people just one joystick per parallel port is not enough, and/or
+want to use them on one parallel port together with NES/SNES/PSX pads. This is
+possible using the gamecon.c. It supports up to 5 devices of the above types,
+including 1 and 2 buttons Multisystem joysticks.
+
+ However, there is nothing for free. To allow more sticks to be used at
+once, you need the sticks to be purely switch based (that is non-TTL), and
+not to need power. Just a plain simple six switches inside. If your
+joystick can do more (eg. turbofire) you'll need to disable it totally first
+if you want to use gamecon.c.
+
+ Also, the connection is a bit more complex. You'll need a bunch of diodes,
+and one pullup resistor. First, you connect the Directions and the button
+the same as for db9, however with the diodes inbetween.
+
+ Diodes
+(pin 2) -----|<|----> Up
+(pin 3) -----|<|----> Down
+(pin 4) -----|<|----> Left
+(pin 5) -----|<|----> Right
+(pin 6) -----|<|----> Button 1
+
+ For two button sticks you also connect the other button.
+
+(pin 7) -----|<|----> Button 2
+
+ And finally, you connect the Ground wire of the joystick, like done in
+this little schematic to Power and Data on the parallel port, as described
+for the NES / SNES pads in section 2.1 of this file - that is, one data pin
+for each joystick. The power source is shared.
+
+Data ------------+-----> Ground
+ Resistor |
+Power --[10kOhm]--+
+
+ And that's all, here we go!
+
+2.2.3 Multisystem joysticks using turbografx.c
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The TurboGraFX interface, designed by
+
+ Steffen Schwenke <schwenke@burg-halle.de>
+
+ allows up to 7 Multisystem joysticks connected to the parallel port. In
+Steffen's version, there is support for up to 5 buttons per joystick. However,
+since this doesn't work reliably on all parallel ports, the turbografx.c driver
+supports only one button per joystick. For more information on how to build the
+interface, see
+
+ http://www2.burg-halle.de/~schwenke/parport.html
+
+2.3 Sony Playstation
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+ The PSX controller is supported by the gamecon.c. Pinout of the PSX
+controller (compatible with DirectPadPro):
+
+ +---------+---------+---------+
+9 | o o o | o o o | o o o | 1 parallel
+ \________|_________|________/ port pins
+ | | | | | |
+ | | | | | +--------> Clock --- (4)
+ | | | | +------------> Select --- (3)
+ | | | +---------------> Power --- (5-9)
+ | | +------------------> Ground --- (18-25)
+ | +-------------------------> Command --- (2)
+ +----------------------------> Data --- (one of 10,11,12,13,15)
+
+ The driver supports these controllers:
+
+ * Standard PSX Pad
+ * NegCon PSX Pad
+ * Analog PSX Pad (red mode)
+ * Analog PSX Pad (green mode)
+ * PSX Rumble Pad
+ * PSX DDR Pad
+
+2.4 Sega
+~~~~~~~~
+ All the Sega controllers are more or less based on the standard 2-button
+Multisystem joystick. However, since they don't use switches and use TTL
+logic, the only driver usable with them is the db9.c driver.
+
+2.4.1 Sega Master System
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The SMS gamepads are almost exactly the same as normal 2-button
+Multisystem joysticks. Set the driver to Multi2 mode, use the corresponding
+parallel port pins, and the following schematic:
+
+ +-----------> Power
+ | +---------> Right
+ | | +-------> Left
+ | | | +-----> Down
+ | | | | +---> Up
+ | | | | |
+ _____________
+5 \ o o o o o / 1
+ \ o o x o /
+ 9 `~~~~~~~' 6
+ | | |
+ | | +----> Button 1
+ | +--------> Ground
+ +----------> Button 2
+
+2.4.2 Sega Genesis aka MegaDrive
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The Sega Genesis (in Europe sold as Sega MegaDrive) pads are an extension
+to the Sega Master System pads. They use more buttons (3+1, 5+1, 6+1). Use
+the following schematic:
+
+ +-----------> Power
+ | +---------> Right
+ | | +-------> Left
+ | | | +-----> Down
+ | | | | +---> Up
+ | | | | |
+ _____________
+5 \ o o o o o / 1
+ \ o o o o /
+ 9 `~~~~~~~' 6
+ | | | |
+ | | | +----> Button 1
+ | | +------> Select
+ | +--------> Ground
+ +----------> Button 2
+
+ The Select pin goes to pin 14 on the parallel port.
+
+(pin 14) -----> Select
+
+ The rest is the same as for Multi2 joysticks using db9.c
+
+2.4.3 Sega Saturn
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Sega Saturn has eight buttons, and to transfer that, without hacks like
+Genesis 6 pads use, it needs one more select pin. Anyway, it is still
+handled by the db9.c driver. Its pinout is very different from anything
+else. Use this schematic:
+
+ +-----------> Select 1
+ | +---------> Power
+ | | +-------> Up
+ | | | +-----> Down
+ | | | | +---> Ground
+ | | | | |
+ _____________
+5 \ o o o o o / 1
+ \ o o o o /
+ 9 `~~~~~~~' 6
+ | | | |
+ | | | +----> Select 2
+ | | +------> Right
+ | +--------> Left
+ +----------> Power
+
+ Select 1 is pin 14 on the parallel port, Select 2 is pin 16 on the
+parallel port.
+
+(pin 14) -----> Select 1
+(pin 16) -----> Select 2
+
+ The other pins (Up, Down, Right, Left, Power, Ground) are the same as for
+Multi joysticks using db9.c
+
+3. The drivers
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ There are three drivers for the parallel port interfaces. Each, as
+described above, allows to connect a different group of joysticks and pads.
+Here are described their command lines:
+
+3.1 gamecon.c
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Using gamecon.c you can connect up to five devices to one parallel port. It
+uses the following kernel/module command line:
+
+ gamecon.map=port,pad1,pad2,pad3,pad4,pad5
+
+ Where 'port' the number of the parport interface (eg. 0 for parport0).
+
+ And 'pad1' to 'pad5' are pad types connected to different data input pins
+(10,11,12,13,15), as described in section 2.1 of this file.
+
+ The types are:
+
+ Type | Joystick/Pad
+ --------------------
+ 0 | None
+ 1 | SNES pad
+ 2 | NES pad
+ 4 | Multisystem 1-button joystick
+ 5 | Multisystem 2-button joystick
+ 6 | N64 pad
+ 7 | Sony PSX controller
+ 8 | Sony PSX DDR controller
+
+ The exact type of the PSX controller type is autoprobed when used so
+hot swapping should work (but is not recomended).
+
+ Should you want to use more than one of parallel ports at once, you can use
+gamecon.map2 and gamecon.map3 as additional command line parameters for two
+more parallel ports.
+
+ There are two options specific to PSX driver portion. gamecon.psx_delay sets
+the command delay when talking to the controllers. The default of 25 should
+work but you can try lowering it for better performace. If your pads don't
+respond try raising it untill they work. Setting the type to 8 allows the
+driver to be used with Dance Dance Revolution or similar games. Arrow keys are
+registered as key presses instead of X and Y axes.
+
+3.2 db9.c
+~~~~~~~~~
+ Apart from making an interface, there is nothing difficult on using the
+db9.c driver. It uses the following kernel/module command line:
+
+ db9.dev=port,type
+
+ Where 'port' is the number of the parport interface (eg. 0 for parport0).
+
+ Caveat here: This driver only works on bidirectional parallel ports. If
+your parallel port is recent enough, you should have no trouble with this.
+Old parallel ports may not have this feature.
+
+ 'Type' is the type of joystick or pad attached:
+
+ Type | Joystick/Pad
+ --------------------
+ 0 | None
+ 1 | Multisystem 1-button joystick
+ 2 | Multisystem 2-button joystick
+ 3 | Genesis pad (3+1 buttons)
+ 5 | Genesis pad (5+1 buttons)
+ 6 | Genesis pad (6+2 buttons)
+ 7 | Saturn pad (8 buttons)
+ 8 | Multisystem 1-button joystick (v0.8.0.2 pin-out)
+ 9 | Two Multisystem 1-button joysticks (v0.8.0.2 pin-out)
+ 10 | Amiga CD32 pad
+
+ Should you want to use more than one of these joysticks/pads at once, you
+can use db9.dev2 and db9.dev3 as additional command line parameters for two
+more joysticks/pads.
+
+3.3 turbografx.c
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The turbografx.c driver uses a very simple kernel/module command line:
+
+ turbografx.map=port,js1,js2,js3,js4,js5,js6,js7
+
+ Where 'port' is the number of the parport interface (eg. 0 for parport0).
+
+ 'jsX' is the number of buttons the Multisystem joysticks connected to the
+interface ports 1-7 have. For a standard multisystem joystick, this is 1.
+
+ Should you want to use more than one of these interfaces at once, you can
+use turbografx.map2 and turbografx.map3 as additional command line parameters
+for two more interfaces.
+
+3.4 PC parallel port pinout
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ .----------------------------------------.
+ At the PC: \ 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 /
+ \ 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 /
+ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+ Pin | Name | Description
+ ~~~~~~|~~~~~~~~~|~~~~~~~~~~
+ 1 | /STROBE | Strobe
+ 2-9 | D0-D7 | Data Bit 0-7
+ 10 | /ACK | Acknowledge
+ 11 | BUSY | Busy
+ 12 | PE | Paper End
+ 13 | SELIN | Select In
+ 14 | /AUTOFD | Autofeed
+ 15 | /ERROR | Error
+ 16 | /INIT | Initialize
+ 17 | /SEL | Select
+ 18-25 | GND | Signal Ground
+
+3.5 End
+~~~~~~~
+ That's all, folks! Have fun!
diff --git a/Documentation/input/joystick.txt b/Documentation/input/joystick.txt
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..d53b857a3710
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/joystick.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,588 @@
+ Linux Joystick driver v2.0.0
+ (c) 1996-2000 Vojtech Pavlik <vojtech@ucw.cz>
+ Sponsored by SuSE
+ $Id: joystick.txt,v 1.12 2002/03/03 12:13:07 jdeneux Exp $
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+0. Disclaimer
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
+under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free
+Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at your option)
+any later version.
+
+ This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
+WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY
+or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for
+more details.
+
+ You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along
+with this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59
+Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA
+
+ Should you need to contact me, the author, you can do so either by e-mail
+- mail your message to <vojtech@ucw.cz>, or by paper mail: Vojtech Pavlik,
+Simunkova 1594, Prague 8, 182 00 Czech Republic
+
+ For your convenience, the GNU General Public License version 2 is included
+in the package: See the file COPYING.
+
+1. Intro
+~~~~~~~~
+ The joystick driver for Linux provides support for a variety of joysticks
+and similar devices. It is based on a larger project aiming to support all
+input devices in Linux.
+
+ Should you encounter any problems while using the driver, or joysticks
+this driver can't make complete use of, I'm very interested in hearing about
+them. Bug reports and success stories are also welcome.
+
+ The input project website is at:
+
+ http://www.suse.cz/development/input/
+ http://atrey.karlin.mff.cuni.cz/~vojtech/input/
+
+ There is also a mailing list for the driver at:
+
+ listproc@atrey.karlin.mff.cuni.cz
+
+send "subscribe linux-joystick Your Name" to subscribe to it.
+
+2. Usage
+~~~~~~~~
+ For basic usage you just choose the right options in kernel config and
+you should be set.
+
+2.1 inpututils
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+For testing and other purposes (for example serial devices), a set of
+utilities is available at the abovementioned website. I suggest you download
+and install it before going on.
+
+2.2 Device nodes
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+For applications to be able to use the joysticks, in you don't use devfs,
+you'll have to manually create these nodes in /dev:
+
+cd /dev
+rm js*
+mkdir input
+mknod input/js0 c 13 0
+mknod input/js1 c 13 1
+mknod input/js2 c 13 2
+mknod input/js3 c 13 3
+ln -s input/js0 js0
+ln -s input/js1 js1
+ln -s input/js2 js2
+ln -s input/js3 js3
+
+For testing with inpututils it's also convenient to create these:
+
+mknod input/event0 c 13 64
+mknod input/event1 c 13 65
+mknod input/event2 c 13 66
+mknod input/event3 c 13 67
+
+2.4 Modules needed
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ For all joystick drivers to function, you'll need the userland interface
+module in kernel, either loaded or compiled in:
+
+ modprobe joydev
+
+ For gameport joysticks, you'll have to load the gameport driver as well;
+
+ modprobe ns558
+
+ And for serial port joysticks, you'll need the serial input line
+discipline module loaded and the inputattach utility started:
+
+ modprobe serport
+ inputattach -xxx /dev/tts/X &
+
+ In addition to that, you'll need the joystick driver module itself, most
+usually you'll have an analog joystick:
+
+ modprobe analog
+
+ For automatic module loading, something like this might work - tailor to
+your needs:
+
+ alias tty-ldisc-2 serport
+ alias char-major-13 input
+ above input joydev ns558 analog
+ options analog map=gamepad,none,2btn
+
+2.5 Verifying that it works
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ For testing the joystick driver functionality, there is the jstest
+program in the utilities package. You run it by typing:
+
+ jstest /dev/js0
+
+ And it should show a line with the joystick values, which update as you
+move the stick, and press its buttons. The axes should all be zero when the
+joystick is in the center position. They should not jitter by themselves to
+other close values, and they also should be steady in any other position of
+the stick. They should have the full range from -32767 to 32767. If all this
+is met, then it's all fine, and you can play the games. :)
+
+ If it's not, then there might be a problem. Try to calibrate the joystick,
+and if it still doesn't work, read the drivers section of this file, the
+troubleshooting section, and the FAQ.
+
+2.6. Calibration
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ For most joysticks you won't need any manual calibration, since the
+joystick should be autocalibrated by the driver automagically. However, with
+some analog joysticks, that either do not use linear resistors, or if you
+want better precision, you can use the jscal program
+
+ jscal -c /dev/js0
+
+ included in the joystick package to set better correction coefficients than
+what the driver would choose itself.
+
+ After calibrating the joystick you can verify if you like the new
+calibration using the jstest command, and if you do, you then can save the
+correction coefficients into a file
+
+ jscal -p /dev/js0 > /etc/joystick.cal
+
+ And add a line to your rc script executing that file
+
+ source /etc/joystick.cal
+
+ This way, after the next reboot your joystick will remain calibrated. You
+can also add the jscal -p line to your shutdown script.
+
+
+3. HW specific driver information
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+In this section each of the separate hardware specific drivers is described.
+
+3.1 Analog joysticks
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The analog.c uses the standard analog inputs of the gameport, and thus
+supports all standard joysticks and gamepads. It uses a very advanced
+routine for this, allowing for data precision that can't be found on any
+other system.
+
+ It also supports extensions like additional hats and buttons compatible
+with CH Flightstick Pro, ThrustMaster FCS or 6 and 8 button gamepads. Saitek
+Cyborg 'digital' joysticks are also supported by this driver, because
+they're basically souped up CHF sticks.
+
+ However the only types that can be autodetected are:
+
+* 2-axis, 4-button joystick
+* 3-axis, 4-button joystick
+* 4-axis, 4-button joystick
+* Saitek Cyborg 'digital' joysticks
+
+ For other joystick types (more/less axes, hats, and buttons) support
+you'll need to specify the types either on the kernel command line or on the
+module command line, when inserting analog into the kernel. The
+parameters are:
+
+ analog.map=<type1>,<type2>,<type3>,....
+
+ 'type' is type of the joystick from the table below, defining joysticks
+present on gameports in the system, starting with gameport0, second 'type'
+entry defining joystick on gameport1 and so on.
+
+ Type | Meaning
+ -----------------------------------
+ none | No analog joystick on that port
+ auto | Autodetect joystick
+ 2btn | 2-button n-axis joystick
+ y-joy | Two 2-button 2-axis joysticks on an Y-cable
+ y-pad | Two 2-button 2-axis gamepads on an Y-cable
+ fcs | Thrustmaster FCS compatible joystick
+ chf | Joystick with a CH Flightstick compatible hat
+ fullchf | CH Flightstick compatible with two hats and 6 buttons
+ gamepad | 4/6-button n-axis gamepad
+ gamepad8 | 8-button 2-axis gamepad
+
+ In case your joystick doesn't fit in any of the above categories, you can
+specify the type as a number by combining the bits in the table below. This
+is not recommended unless you really know what are you doing. It's not
+dangerous, but not simple either.
+
+ Bit | Meaning
+ --------------------------
+ 0 | Axis X1
+ 1 | Axis Y1
+ 2 | Axis X2
+ 3 | Axis Y2
+ 4 | Button A
+ 5 | Button B
+ 6 | Button C
+ 7 | Button D
+ 8 | CHF Buttons X and Y
+ 9 | CHF Hat 1
+ 10 | CHF Hat 2
+ 11 | FCS Hat
+ 12 | Pad Button X
+ 13 | Pad Button Y
+ 14 | Pad Button U
+ 15 | Pad Button V
+ 16 | Saitek F1-F4 Buttons
+ 17 | Saitek Digital Mode
+ 19 | GamePad
+ 20 | Joy2 Axis X1
+ 21 | Joy2 Axis Y1
+ 22 | Joy2 Axis X2
+ 23 | Joy2 Axis Y2
+ 24 | Joy2 Button A
+ 25 | Joy2 Button B
+ 26 | Joy2 Button C
+ 27 | Joy2 Button D
+ 31 | Joy2 GamePad
+
+3.2 Microsoft SideWinder joysticks
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Microsoft 'Digital Overdrive' protocol is supported by the sidewinder.c
+module. All currently supported joysticks:
+
+* Microsoft SideWinder 3D Pro
+* Microsoft SideWinder Force Feedback Pro
+* Microsoft SideWinder Force Feedback Wheel
+* Microsoft SideWinder FreeStyle Pro
+* Microsoft SideWinder GamePad (up to four, chained)
+* Microsoft SideWinder Precision Pro
+* Microsoft SideWinder Precision Pro USB
+
+ are autodetected, and thus no module parameters are needed.
+
+ There is one caveat with the 3D Pro. There are 9 buttons reported,
+although the joystick has only 8. The 9th button is the mode switch on the
+rear side of the joystick. However, moving it, you'll reset the joystick,
+and make it unresponsive for about a one third of a second. Furthermore, the
+joystick will also re-center itself, taking the position it was in during
+this time as a new center position. Use it if you want, but think first.
+
+ The SideWinder Standard is not a digital joystick, and thus is supported
+by the analog driver described above.
+
+3.3 Logitech ADI devices
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Logitech ADI protocol is supported by the adi.c module. It should support
+any Logitech device using this protocol. This includes, but is not limited
+to:
+
+* Logitech CyberMan 2
+* Logitech ThunderPad Digital
+* Logitech WingMan Extreme Digital
+* Logitech WingMan Formula
+* Logitech WingMan Interceptor
+* Logitech WingMan GamePad
+* Logitech WingMan GamePad USB
+* Logitech WingMan GamePad Extreme
+* Logitech WingMan Extreme Digital 3D
+
+ ADI devices are autodetected, and the driver supports up to two (any
+combination of) devices on a single gameport, using an Y-cable or chained
+together.
+
+ Logitech WingMan Joystick, Logitech WingMan Attack, Logitech WingMan
+Extreme and Logitech WingMan ThunderPad are not digital joysticks and are
+handled by the analog driver described above. Logitech WingMan Warrior and
+Logitech Magellan are supported by serial drivers described below. Logitech
+WingMan Force and Logitech WingMan Formula Force are supported by the
+I-Force driver described below. Logitech CyberMan is not supported yet.
+
+3.4 Gravis GrIP
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Gravis GrIP protocol is supported by the grip.c module. It currently
+supports:
+
+* Gravis GamePad Pro
+* Gravis BlackHawk Digital
+* Gravis Xterminator
+* Gravis Xterminator DualControl
+
+ All these devices are autodetected, and you can even use any combination
+of up to two of these pads either chained together or using an Y-cable on a
+single gameport.
+
+GrIP MultiPort isn't supported yet. Gravis Stinger is a serial device and is
+supported by the stinger driver. Other Gravis joysticks are supported by the
+analog driver.
+
+3.5 FPGaming A3D and MadCatz A3D
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The Assassin 3D protocol created by FPGaming, is used both by FPGaming
+themselves and is licensed to MadCatz. A3D devices are supported by the
+a3d.c module. It currently supports:
+
+* FPGaming Assassin 3D
+* MadCatz Panther
+* MadCatz Panther XL
+
+ All these devices are autodetected. Because the Assassin 3D and the Panther
+allow connecting analog joysticks to them, you'll need to load the analog
+driver as well to handle the attached joysticks.
+
+ The trackball should work with USB mousedev module as a normal mouse. See
+the USB documentation for how to setup an USB mouse.
+
+3.6 ThrustMaster DirectConnect (BSP)
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The TM DirectConnect (BSP) protocol is supported by the tmdc.c
+module. This includes, but is not limited to:
+
+* ThrustMaster Millenium 3D Inceptor
+* ThrustMaster 3D Rage Pad
+* ThrustMaster Fusion Digital Game Pad
+
+ Devices not directly supported, but hopefully working are:
+
+* ThrustMaster FragMaster
+* ThrustMaster Attack Throttle
+
+ If you have one of these, contact me.
+
+ TMDC devices are autodetected, and thus no parameters to the module
+are needed. Up to two TMDC devices can be connected to one gameport, using
+an Y-cable.
+
+3.7 Creative Labs Blaster
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The Blaster protocol is supported by the cobra.c module. It supports only
+the:
+
+* Creative Blaster GamePad Cobra
+
+ Up to two of these can be used on a single gameport, using an Y-cable.
+
+3.8 Genius Digital joysticks
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The Genius digitally communicating joysticks are supported by the gf2k.c
+module. This includes:
+
+* Genius Flight2000 F-23 joystick
+* Genius Flight2000 F-31 joystick
+* Genius G-09D gamepad
+
+ Other Genius digital joysticks are not supported yet, but support can be
+added fairly easily.
+
+3.9 InterAct Digital joysticks
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The InterAct digitally communicating joysticks are supported by the
+interact.c module. This includes:
+
+* InterAct HammerHead/FX gamepad
+* InterAct ProPad8 gamepad
+
+ Other InterAct digital joysticks are not supported yet, but support can be
+added fairly easily.
+
+3.10 PDPI Lightning 4 gamecards
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ PDPI Lightning 4 gamecards are supported by the lightning.c module.
+Once the module is loaded, the analog driver can be used to handle the
+joysticks. Digitally communicating joystick will work only on port 0, while
+using Y-cables, you can connect up to 8 analog joysticks to a single L4
+card, 16 in case you have two in your system.
+
+3.11 Trident 4DWave / Aureal Vortex
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Soundcards with a Trident 4DWave DX/NX or Aureal Vortex/Vortex2 chipsets
+provide an "Enhanced Game Port" mode where the soundcard handles polling the
+joystick. This mode is supported by the pcigame.c module. Once loaded the
+analog driver can use the enhanced features of these gameports..
+
+3.13 Crystal SoundFusion
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ Soundcards with Crystal SoundFusion chipsets provide an "Enhanced Game
+Port", much like the 4DWave or Vortex above. This, and also the normal mode
+for the port of the SoundFusion is supported by the cs461x.c module.
+
+3.14 SoundBlaster Live!
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The Live! has a special PCI gameport, which, although it doesn't provide
+any "Enhanced" stuff like 4DWave and friends, is quite a bit faster than
+it's ISA counterparts. It also requires special support, hence the
+emu10k1-gp.c module for it instead of the normal ns558.c one.
+
+3.15 SoundBlaster 64 and 128 - ES1370 and ES1371, ESS Solo1 and S3 SonicVibes
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ These PCI soundcards have specific gameports. They are handled by the
+sound drivers themselves. Make sure you select gameport support in the
+joystick menu and sound card support in the sound menu for your appropriate
+card.
+
+3.16 Amiga
+~~~~~~~~~~
+ Amiga joysticks, connected to an Amiga, are supported by the amijoy.c
+driver. Since they can't be autodetected, the driver has a command line.
+
+ amijoy.map=<a>,<b>
+
+ a and b define the joysticks connected to the JOY0DAT and JOY1DAT ports of
+the Amiga.
+
+ Value | Joystick type
+ ---------------------
+ 0 | None
+ 1 | 1-button digital joystick
+
+ No more joystick types are supported now, but that should change in the
+future if I get an Amiga in the reach of my fingers.
+
+3.17 Game console and 8-bit pads and joysticks
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+See joystick-parport.txt for more info.
+
+3.18 SpaceTec/LabTec devices
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ SpaceTec serial devices communicate using the SpaceWare protocol. It is
+supported by the spaceorb.c and spaceball.c drivers. The devices currently
+supported by spaceorb.c are:
+
+* SpaceTec SpaceBall Avenger
+* SpaceTec SpaceOrb 360
+
+Devices currently supported by spaceball.c are:
+
+* SpaceTec SpaceBall 4000 FLX
+
+ In addition to having the spaceorb/spaceball and serport modules in the
+kernel, you also need to attach a serial port to it. to do that, run the
+inputattach program:
+
+ inputattach --spaceorb /dev/tts/x &
+or
+ inputattach --spaceball /dev/tts/x &
+
+where /dev/tts/x is the serial port which the device is connected to. After
+doing this, the device will be reported and will start working.
+
+ There is one caveat with the SpaceOrb. The button #6, the on the bottom
+side of the orb, although reported as an ordinary button, causes internal
+recentering of the spaceorb, moving the zero point to the position in which
+the ball is at the moment of pressing the button. So, think first before
+you bind it to some other function.
+
+SpaceTec SpaceBall 2003 FLX and 3003 FLX are not supported yet.
+
+3.19 Logitech SWIFT devices
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The SWIFT serial protocol is supported by the warrior.c module. It
+currently supports only the:
+
+* Logitech WingMan Warrior
+
+but in the future, Logitech CyberMan (the original one, not CM2) could be
+supported as well. To use the module, you need to run inputattach after you
+insert/compile the module into your kernel:
+
+ inputattach --warrior /dev/tts/x &
+
+/dev/tts/x is the serial port your Warrior is attached to.
+
+3.20 Magellan / Space Mouse
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The Magellan (or Space Mouse), manufactured by LogiCad3d (formerly Space
+Systems), for many other companies (Logitech, HP, ...) is supported by the
+joy-magellan module. It currently supports only the:
+
+* Magellan 3D
+* Space Mouse
+
+models, the additional buttons on the 'Plus' versions are not supported yet.
+
+ To use it, you need to attach the serial port to the driver using the
+
+ inputattach --magellan /dev/tts/x &
+
+command. After that the Magellan will be detected, initialized, will beep,
+and the /dev/input/jsX device should become usable.
+
+3.21 I-Force devices
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ All I-Force devices are supported by the iforce module. This includes:
+
+* AVB Mag Turbo Force
+* AVB Top Shot Pegasus
+* AVB Top Shot Force Feedback Racing Wheel
+* Logitech WingMan Force
+* Logitech WingMan Force Wheel
+* Guillemot Race Leader Force Feedback
+* Guillemot Force Feedback Racing Wheel
+* Thrustmaster Motor Sport GT
+
+ To use it, you need to attach the serial port to the driver using the
+
+ inputattach --iforce /dev/tts/x &
+
+command. After that the I-Force device will be detected, and the
+/dev/input/jsX device should become usable.
+
+ In case you're using the device via the USB port, the inputattach command
+isn't needed.
+
+ The I-Force driver now supports force feedback via the event interface.
+
+ Please note that Logitech WingMan *3D devices are _not_ supported by this
+module, rather by hid. Force feedback is not supported for those devices.
+Logitech gamepads are also hid devices.
+
+3.22 Gravis Stinger gamepad
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The Gravis Stinger serial port gamepad, designed for use with laptop
+computers, is supported by the stinger.c module. To use it, attach the
+serial port to the driver using:
+
+ inputattach --stinger /dev/tty/x &
+
+where x is the number of the serial port.
+
+4. Troubleshooting
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ There is quite a high probability that you run into some problems. For
+testing whether the driver works, if in doubt, use the jstest utility in
+some of its modes. The most useful modes are "normal" - for the 1.x
+interface, and "old" for the "0.x" interface. You run it by typing:
+
+ jstest --normal /dev/input/js0
+ jstest --old /dev/input/js0
+
+ Additionally you can do a test with the evtest utility:
+
+ evtest /dev/input/event0
+
+ Oh, and read the FAQ! :)
+
+5. FAQ
+~~~~~~
+Q: Running 'jstest /dev/js0' results in "File not found" error. What's the
+ cause?
+A: The device files don't exist. Create them (see section 2.2).
+
+Q: Is it possible to connect my old Atari/Commodore/Amiga/console joystick
+ or pad that uses a 9-pin D-type cannon connector to the serial port of my
+ PC?
+A: Yes, it is possible, but it'll burn your serial port or the pad. It
+ won't work, of course.
+
+Q: My joystick doesn't work with Quake / Quake 2. What's the cause?
+A: Quake / Quake 2 don't support joystick. Use joy2key to simulate keypresses
+ for them.
+
+6. Programming Interface
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The 1.0 driver uses a new, event based approach to the joystick driver.
+Instead of the user program polling for the joystick values, the joystick
+driver now reports only any changes of its state. See joystick-api.txt,
+joystick.h and jstest.c included in the joystick package for more
+information. The joystick device can be used in either blocking or
+nonblocking mode and supports select() calls.
+
+ For backward compatibility the old (v0.x) interface is still included.
+Any call to the joystick driver using the old interface will return values
+that are compatible to the old interface. This interface is still limited
+to 2 axes, and applications using it usually decode only 2 buttons, although
+the driver provides up to 32.
diff --git a/Documentation/input/shape.fig b/Documentation/input/shape.fig
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..c22bff83d06f
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/shape.fig
@@ -0,0 +1,65 @@
+#FIG 3.2
+Landscape
+Center
+Inches
+Letter
+100.00
+Single
+-2
+1200 2
+2 1 0 2 0 7 50 0 -1 0.000 0 0 -1 0 0 6
+ 4200 3600 4200 3075 4950 2325 7425 2325 8250 3150 8250 3600
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 2
+ 4200 3675 4200 5400
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 2
+ 8250 3675 8250 5400
+2 1 0 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 2
+ 3675 3600 8700 3600
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 2
+ 8775 3600 10200 3600
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 2
+ 8325 3150 9075 3150
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 2
+ 7500 2325 10200 2325
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 2
+ 3600 3600 3000 3600
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 2
+ 4125 3075 3000 3075
+2 1 0 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 1 1 2
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 4200 5400 8175 5400
+2 1 0 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 1 1 2
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 10125 2325 10125 3600
+2 1 0 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 1 1 2
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 3000 3150 3000 3600
+2 1 0 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 1 1 2
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 9075 3150 9075 3600
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 2
+ 4950 2325 4950 1200
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 2
+ 7425 2325 7425 1200
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 4
+ 4200 3075 4200 2400 3600 1800 3600 1200
+2 1 1 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 0 0 4
+ 8250 3150 8250 2475 8775 1950 8775 1200
+2 1 0 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 1 1 2
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 3600 1275 4950 1275
+2 1 0 1 0 7 50 0 -1 4.000 0 0 -1 1 1 2
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 0 0 1.00 60.00 120.00
+ 7425 1275 8700 1275
+4 1 0 50 0 0 12 0.0000 4 135 1140 6075 5325 Effect duration\001
+4 0 0 50 0 0 12 0.0000 4 180 1305 10200 3000 Effect magnitude\001
+4 0 0 50 0 0 12 0.0000 4 135 780 9150 3450 Fade level\001
+4 1 0 50 0 0 12 0.0000 4 180 1035 4275 1200 Attack length\001
+4 1 0 50 0 0 12 0.0000 4 180 885 8175 1200 Fade length\001
+4 2 0 50 0 0 12 0.0000 4 135 930 2925 3375 Attack level\001
diff --git a/Documentation/input/xpad.txt b/Documentation/input/xpad.txt
new file mode 100644
index 000000000000..b9111a703ce0
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/xpad.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,116 @@
+xpad - Linux USB driver for X-Box gamepads
+
+This is the very first release of a driver for X-Box gamepads.
+Basically, this was hacked away in just a few hours, so don't expect
+miracles.
+In particular, there is currently NO support for the rumble pack.
+You won't find many ff-aware linux applications anyway.
+
+
+0. Status
+---------
+
+For now, this driver has only been tested on just one Linux-Box.
+This one is running a 2.4.18 kernel with usb-uhci on an amd athlon 600.
+
+The jstest-program from joystick-1.2.15 (jstest-version 2.1.0) reports
+8 axes and 10 buttons.
+
+Alls 8 axes work, though they all have the same range (-32768..32767)
+and the zero-setting is not correct for the triggers (I don't know if that
+is some limitation of jstest, since the input device setup should be fine. I
+didn't have a look at jstest itself yet).
+
+All of the 10 buttons work (in digital mode). The six buttons on the
+right side (A, B, X, Y, black, white) are said to be "analog" and
+report their values as 8 bit unsigned, not sure what this is good for.
+
+I tested the controller with quake3, and configuration and
+in game functionality were OK. However, I find it rather difficult to
+play first person shooters with a pad. Your mileage may vary.
+
+
+1. USB adapter
+--------------
+
+Before you can actually use the driver, you need to get yourself an
+adapter cable to connect the X-Box controller to your Linux-Box.
+
+Such a cable is pretty easy to build. The Controller itself is a USB compound
+device (a hub with three ports for two expansion slots and the controller
+device) with the only difference in a nonstandard connector (5 pins vs. 4 on
+standard USB connector).
+
+You just need to solder a USB connector onto the cable and keep the
+yellow wire unconnected. The other pins have the same order on both
+connectors so there is no magic to it. Detailed info on these matters
+can be found on the net ([1], [2], [3]).
+
+Thanks to the trip splitter found on the cable you don't even need to cut the
+original one. You can buy an extension cable and cut that instead. That way,
+you can still use the controller with your X-Box, if you have one ;)
+
+
+2. driver installation
+----------------------
+
+Once you have the adapter cable and the controller is connected, you need
+to load your USB subsystem and should cat /proc/bus/usb/devices.
+There should be an entry like the one at the end [4].
+
+Currently (as of version 0.0.4), the following three devices are included:
+ original Microsoft XBOX controller (US), vendor=0x045e, product=0x0202
+ original Microsoft XBOX controller (Japan), vendor=0x045e, product=0x0285
+ InterAct PowerPad Pro (Germany), vendor=0x05fd, product=0x107a
+
+If you have another controller that is not listed above and is not recognized
+by the driver, please drop me a line with the appropriate info (that is, include
+the name, vendor and product ID, as well as the country where you bought it;
+sending the whole dump out of /proc/bus/usb/devices along would be even better).
+
+In theory, the driver should work with other controllers than mine
+(InterAct PowerPad pro, bought in Germany) just fine, but I cannot test this
+for I only have this one controller.
+
+If you compiled and installed the driver, test the functionality:
+> modprobe xpad
+> modprobe joydev
+> jstest /dev/js0
+
+There should be a single line showing 18 inputs (8 axes, 10 buttons), and
+it's values should change if you move the sticks and push the buttons.
+
+It works? Voila, your done ;)
+
+
+3. Thanks
+---------
+
+I have to thank ITO Takayuki for the detailed info on his site
+ http://euc.jp/periphs/xbox-controller.ja.html.
+
+His useful info and both the usb-skeleton as well as the iforce input driver
+(Greg Kroah-Hartmann; Vojtech Pavlik) helped a lot in rapid prototyping
+the basic functionality.
+
+
+4. References
+-------------
+
+1. http://euc.jp/periphs/xbox-controller.ja.html (ITO Takayuki)
+2. http://xpad.xbox-scene.com/
+3. http://www.xboxhackz.com/Hackz-Reference.htm
+
+4. /proc/bus/usb/devices - dump from InterAct PowerPad Pro (Germany):
+
+T: Bus=01 Lev=03 Prnt=04 Port=00 Cnt=01 Dev#= 5 Spd=12 MxCh= 0
+D: Ver= 1.10 Cls=00(>ifc ) Sub=00 Prot=00 MxPS=32 #Cfgs= 1
+P: Vendor=05fd ProdID=107a Rev= 1.00
+C:* #Ifs= 1 Cfg#= 1 Atr=80 MxPwr=100mA
+I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 2 Cls=58(unk. ) Sub=42 Prot=00 Driver=(none)
+E: Ad=81(I) Atr=03(Int.) MxPS= 32 Ivl= 10ms
+E: Ad=02(O) Atr=03(Int.) MxPS= 32 Ivl= 10ms
+
+--
+Marko Friedemann <mfr@bmx-chemnitz.de>
+2002-07-16